Course Descriptions of Webcast.berkeley Courses

webcast.berkeley
courses events

Spring 2015
Bioengineering 200, 002 – Spring 2015
KEVIN E. HEALY
The Graduate Group Introductory Seminar – An introduction to research in bioengineering including specific case studies and organization of this rapidly expanding and diverse field.

Biology 1A, 001 – Spring 2015
GARY L. FIRESTONE, ANDREW DILLIN, JENNIFER A DOUDNA, MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function.

Biology 1AL, 001 – Spring 2015
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1B, 001 – Spring 2015
ALAN SHABEL, GEORGE RODERICK, LEWIS J FELDMAN
General introduction to plant development, form, and function; population genetics, ecology, and evolution. Intended for students majoring in the biological sciences, but open to all qualified students.

Computer Science 10, 001 – Spring 2015
DANIEL GARCIA
The Beauty and Joy of Computing – An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing. The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the world. How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.

Computer Science 162, 001 – Spring 2015
JOHN KUBIATOWICZ
Operating Systems and System Programming – Basic concepts of operating systems and system programming. Utility programs, subsystems, multiple-program systems. Processes, interprocess communication, and synchronization. Memory allocation, segmentation, paging. Loading and linking, libraries. Resource allocation, scheduling, performance evaluation. File systems, storage devices, I/O systems. Protection, security, and privacy.

Computer Science 169, 001 – Spring 2015
ARMANDO FOX
Software Engineering – Ideas and techniques for designing, developing, and modifying large software systems. Function-oriented and object-oriented modular design techniques, designing for re-use and maintainability. Specification and documentation. Verification and validation. Cost and quality metrics and estimation. Project team organization and management. Students will work in teams on a substantial programming project.

Computer Science 170, 001 – Spring 2015
PRASAD RAGHAVENDRA, CHRISTOS H PAPADIMITRIOU
Efficient Algorithms and Intractable Problems – Concept and basic techniques in the design and analysis of algorithms; models of computation; lower bounds; algorithms for optimum search trees, balanced trees and UNION-FIND algorithms; numerical and algebraic algorithms; combinatorial algorithms. Turing machines, how to count steps, deterministic and nondeterministic Turing machines, NP-completeness. Unsolvable and intractable problems.

Computer Science 186, 001 – Spring 2015
JOSEPH HELLERSTEIN
Introduction to Database Systems – Access methods and file systems to facilitate data access. Hierarchical, network, relational, and object-oriented data models. Query languages for models. Embedding query languages in programming languages. Database services including protection, integrity control, and alternative views of data. High-level interfaces including application generators, browsers, and report writers. Introduction to transaction processing. Database system implementation to be done as term project.

Computer Science 188, 001 – Spring 2015
PIETER ABBEEL, DAN KLEIN
Basic ideas and techniques underlying the design of intelligent computer systems. Topics include heuristic search, problem solving, game playing, knowledge representation, logical inference, planning, reasoning under uncertainty, expert systems, learning, perception, language understanding.

Computer Science 195, 001 – Spring 2015
JOHN S. DENERO
Social Implications of Computer Technology – Topics include electronic community; the changing nature of work; technological risks; the information economy; intellectual property; privacy; artificial intelligence and the sense of self; pornography and censorship; professional ethics. Students will lead discussions on additional topics.

Computer Science 198, 032 – Spring 2015
BJOERN HARTMANN
Web Design Decal.

Computer Science 61A, 001 – Spring 2015
JOHN S. DENERO
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs – Introduction to programming and computer science. This course exposes students to techniques of abstraction at several levels: (a) within a programming language, using higher-order functions, manifest types, data-directed programming, and message-passing; (b) between programming languages, using functional and rule-based languages as examples. It also relates these techniques to the practical problems of implementation of languages and algorithms on a von Neumann machine. There are several significant programming projects, programmed in a dialect of the LISP language.

Computer Science 61B, 002 – Spring 2015
JOSHUA A. HUG
Data Structrues – Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays strings, and hash tables. Storage management. Elementary principles of software engineering. Abstract data types. Algorithms for sorting and searching. Introduction to the Java programming language.

Computer Science 61C, 001 – Spring 2015
VLADIMIR STOJANOVIC. KRSTE ASANOVIC
Machine Structures – The internal organization and operation of digital computers. Machine architecture, support for high-level languages (logic, arithmetic, instruction sequencing) and operating systems (I/O, interrupts, memory management, process switching). Elements of computer logic design. Tradeoffs involved in fundamental architectural design decisions.

Computer Science 70, 001 – Spring 2015
UMESH VAZIRANI
Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory – Logic, infinity, and induction; applications include undecidability and stable marriage problem. Modular arithmetic and GCDs; applications include primality testing and cryptography. Polynomials; examples include error correcting codes and interpolation. Probability including sample spaces, independence, random variables, law of large numbers; examples include load balancing, existence arguments, Bayesian inference.

Computer Science 98, 052 – Spring 2015
JOHN S. DENERO
Additional Topics on the Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs. – The course must be taken concurrently with Computer Science 61A and will cover additional topics and examples related to Computer Science 61A.

Economics 113, 001 – Spring 2015
MARTHA OLNEY
American Economic History A survey of trends in the American economy; emphasis on factors explaining economic growth and on the changing distribution of the gains and losses associated with growth

Economics 270D, 001 – Spring 2015
EDWARD ANDREW MIGUEL
Special Topics in Development – See course announcement for current topics and prerequisites.

Electrical Engineering 123, 001 – Spring 2015
SHIMON MICHAEL LUSTIG
Digital Signal Processing – Discrete time signals and systems: Fourier and Z transforms, DFT, 2-dimensional versions. Digital signal processing topics: flow graphs, realizations, FFT, chirp-Z algorithms, Hilbert transform relations, quantization effects, linear prediction. Digital filter design methods: windowing, frequency sampling, S-to-Z methods, frequency-transformation methods, optimization methods, 2-dimensional filter design.

Electrical Engineering C247B, 001 – Spring 2015
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
This course is the same as Mechanical Engineering C218.Introduction to MEMS Design – Physics, fabrication, and design of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). Micro and nanofabrication processes, including silicon surface and bulk micromachining and non-silicon micromachining. Integration strategies and assembly processes. Microsensor and microactuator devices: electrostatic, piezoresistive, piezoelectric, thermal, magnetic transduction. Electronic position-sensing circuits and electrical and mechanical noise. CAD for MEMS. Design project is required.

Environ Sci, Policy, and Management 114, 001 – Spring 2015
JUSTIN S. BRASHARES
Wildlife Ecology – Introduction to wildlife ecology and its relationship to management programs. Includes population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization, followed by selected case studies.

Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C11, 001 – Spring 2015
LYNN HUNTSINGER
This course is the same as Letters and Science C30U. Americans and the Global Forest – This course challenges students to think about how individual and American consumer decisions affect forest ecosystems around the world. A survey course that highlights the consequences of different ways of thinking about the forest as a global ecosystem and as a source of goods like trees, water, wildlife, food, jobs, and services. The scientific tools and concepts that have guided management of the forest for the last 100 years, and the laws, rules, and informal institutions that have shaped use of the forests, are analyzed.

Geography 130, 001 – Spring 2015
NATHAN F. SAYRE
Food and the Environment – How do human populations organize and alter natural resources and ecosystems to produce food? The role of agriculture in the world economy, national development, and environmental degradation in the Global North and the Global South. The origins of scarcity and abundance, population growth and migration, hunger, and poverty.

International and Area Studies 106, 001 – Spring 2015
MAXIMILIAN AUFFHAMMER
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory – This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of intermediate microeconomic theory. It covers a number of topics including consumer and demand theory, firm, production and cost theory, competitive market theory, imperfect competition, welfare economics, choice under uncertainty and information. All analysis conducted in the course relies on graphical and algebraic techniques.

Japanese 7B, 001 – Spring 2015
JOHN R. WALLACE
Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture – An introduction to Japanese literature in translation in a two-semester sequence. 7B provides a survey of important works of 19th- and 20th-century Japanese fiction, poetry, and cultural criticism. The course will explore the manner in which writers responded to the challenges of industrialization, internationalization, and war. Topics include the shifting notions of tradition and modernity, the impact of Westernization on the constructions of the self and gender, writers and the wartime state, literature of the atomic bomb, and postmodern fantasies and aesthetics. All readings are in English translation. Techniques of critical reading and writing will be introduced as an integral part of the course.

Letters and Science C30U, 001 – Spring 2015
LYNN HUNTSINGER
This course is the same as Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C11. Americans and the Global Forest – This course challenges students to think about how individual and American consumer decisions affect forest ecosystems around the world. A survey course that highlights the consequences of different ways of thinking about the forest as a global ecosystem and as a source of goods like trees, water, wildlife, food, jobs, and services. The scientific tools and concepts that have guided management of the forest for the last 100 years, and the laws, rules, and informal institutions that have shaped use of the forests, are analyzed.

Letters and Science C70V, 001 – Spring 2015
STEVEN W. STAHLER
This course is the same as Physics C10. Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Mechanical Engineering C218, 001 – Spring 2015
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
This course is the same as Electrical Engineering C247B.Introduction to MEMS Design – Physics, fabrication, and design of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). Micro and nanofabrication processes, including silicon surface and bulk micromachining and non-silicon micromachining. Integration strategies and assembly processes. Microsensor and microactuator devices: electrostatic, piezoresistive, piezoelectric, thermal, magnetic transduction. Electronic position-sensing circuits and electrical and mechanical noise. CAD for MEMS. Design project is required.

Media Studies 104A, 001 – Spring 2015
WILLIAM B. TURNER
Freedom of Speech and the Press – The course considers the history and contemporary meaning of the First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and the press. Emphasizing the real world implications of major Supreme Court decisions, the course examines restrictions on speech and press imposed by national security, libel, injurious speech, and privacy, as well as issues of access to information and government regulation of new media.

Physics 8B, 001 – Spring 2015
MELVIN POMERANTZ
Introductory Physics – Introduction to electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, and modern physics. The course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.

Physics C10, 001 – Spring 2015
STEVEN W. STAHLER
This course is the same as Letters and Science C70V. Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Political Science 179, 001 – Spring 2015
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science – Political issues facing the state of California, the United States, or the international community.

Psychology 1, 001 – Spring 2015
CHRISTOPHER GADE
General Psychology – Introduction to the principal areas, problems, and concepts of psychology. This course is required for the major; students not considering a psychology major are directed to 2.

Psychology 131, 001 – Spring 2015
STEPHEN HINSHAW
Developmental Psychopathology – This course will discuss linkages between developmental processes and child psychopathology. Included will be discussion of cognitive impairments in children, including learning disabilities and mental retardation; internalizing disorders, such as anxiety, withdrawal, and depression; externalizing disorders, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder; and child abuse and neglect. Psychobiological, familial, legal, and societal factors will be emphasized.

Psychology 140, 001 – Spring 2015
ALISON GOPNIK
Developmental Psychology – This course explores the development of children from birth to adolescence, in a wide range of areas including biological, cognitive, linguistic, social, and personality development. It also covers the effects of genes, experience, and social context on children’s development.

Public Health 142, 001 – Spring 2015
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Introduction to Probability and Statistics in Biology and Public Health – Descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square, correlation and regression with biomedical applications.

Public Health 241, 001 – Spring 2015
NICHOLAS P. JEWELL
Statistical Analysis of Categorical Data – Biostatistical concepts and modeling relevant to the design and analysis of multifactor population-based cohort and case-control studies, including matching. Measures of association, causal inference, confounding interaction. Introduction to binary regression, including logistic regression.

Statistics 131A, 001 – Spring 2015
FLETCHER H IBSER
Statistical Inferences for Social and Life Scientists – Ideas for estimation and hypothesis testing basic to applications, including an introduction to probability. Linear estimation and normal regression theory.

Fall 2014
Agricultural and Resource Economics 213, 001 – Fall 2014
MICHAEL ANDERSON
Applied Econometrics – Standard and advanced econometric techniques are applied to topics in agriculture and resource economics. Techniques include limited dependent variables, time series analysis, and nonparametric analysis. Students will use computers to conduct statistical analyses.

American Studies C132B, 001 – Fall 2014
RICHARD CANDIDA SMITH
Intellectual History of the United States since 1865 – In this course we will be discussing key developments in U.S. thought since the middle of the nineteenth century, roughly beginning with the reception of Darwin. The broader story told in the class weaves together in the history of science and engineering, the arts and popular culture, philosophy, and education. Our goal is to trace how ideas, whether they are dominant, challenging, or look back, have affected the ways in which Americans live together. We will look at how intellectual life has empowered and expanded the capacity of Americans to understand their world and achieve goals more effectively. We will also consider how intellectual theories have contributed to inequality and injustice.

Astronomy C12, 001 – Fall 2014
GEOFFREY W. MARCY
The Planets – A tour of the mysteries and inner workings of our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do they orbit the sun the way they do? How do planets form, and what are they made of? Why do some bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes? What makes the Earth hospitable for life? Is the Earth a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This course will introduce basic physics, chemistry, and math to understand planets, moons, rings, comets, asteroids, atmospheres, and oceans. Understanding other worlds will help us save our own planet and help us understand our place in the universe.

Astronomy C13, 001 – Fall 2014
CHARLES MARSHALL, ELIOT QUATAERT
Origins: from the Big Bang to the Emergence of Humans – This course will cover our modern scientific understanding of origins, from the Big Bang to the formation of planets like Earth, evolution by natural selection, the genetic basis of evolution, and the emergence of humans. These ideas are of great intrinsic scientific importance and also have far reaching implications for other aspects of people’s lives (e.g., philosophical, religious, and political). A major theme will be the scientific method and how we know what we know.

Bioengineering 200, 002 – Fall 2014
KEVIN E. HEALY
The Graduate Group Introductory Seminar – An introduction to research in bioengineering including specific case studies and organization of this rapidly expanding and diverse field.

Biology 1AL, 001 – Fall 2014
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1B, 001 – Fall 2014
ALAN SHABEL, JOHN P. HUELSENBECK, DAVID D ACKERLY
General introduction to plant development, form, and function; population genetics, ecology, and evolution. Intended for students majoring in the biological sciences, but open to all qualified students.

Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering 179, 001 – Fall 2014
DAVID B. GRAVES
Process Technology of Solid-State Materials Devices – Chemical processing and properties of solid-state materials. Crystal growth and purification. Thin film technology. Application of chemical processing to the manufacture of semiconductors and solid-state devices.

Chemistry 3B, 002 – Fall 2014
K. PETER VOLLHARDT
Chemical Structure and Reactivity – Conjugation, aromatic chemistry, carbonyl compounds, carbohydrates, amines, carboxylic acids, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acid chemistry. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and mass spectrometry will be introduced.

Cognitive Science C102, 001 – Fall 2014
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
Scientific Approaches to Consciousness – This course will examine the nature of human consciousness from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science. It will cover topics from the philosophy of mind, cognitive linguistics, neuroscience, psychology, and computational models.

Computer Science 10, 001 – Fall 2014
GERALD FRIEDLAND
The Beauty and Joy of Computing – An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing. The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the world. How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.

Computer Science 162, 001 – Fall 2014
DAVID CULLER
Operating Systems and System Programming – Basic concepts of operating systems and system programming. Utility programs, subsystems, multiple-program systems. Processes, interprocess communication, and synchronization. Memory allocation, segmentation, paging. Loading and linking, libraries. Resource allocation, scheduling, performance evaluation. File systems, storage devices, I/O systems. Protection, security, and privacy.

Computer Science 170, 001 – Fall 2014
DAVID WAGNER
Efficient Algorithms and Intractable Problems – Concept and basic techniques in the design and analysis of algorithms; models of computation; lower bounds; algorithms for optimum search trees, balanced trees and UNION-FIND algorithms; numerical and algebraic algorithms; combinatorial algorithms. Turing machines, how to count steps, deterministic and nondeterministic Turing machines, NP-completeness. Unsolvable and intractable problems.

Computer Science 61A, 001 – Fall 2014
JOHN S. DENERO
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs – Introduction to programming and computer science. This course exposes students to techniques of abstraction at several levels: (a) within a programming language, using higher-order functions, manifest types, data-directed programming, and message-passing; (b) between programming languages, using functional and rule-based languages as examples. It also relates these techniques to the practical problems of implementation of languages and algorithms on a von Neumann machine. There are several significant programming projects, programmed in a dialect of the LISP language.

Computer Science 61B, 001 – Fall 2014
PAUL HILFINGER
Data Structrues – Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays strings, and hash tables. Storage management. Elementary principles of software engineering. Abstract data types. Algorithms for sorting and searching. Introduction to the Java programming language.

Computer Science 61B, 003 – Fall 2014
JOSHUA A. HUG
Data Structrues – Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays strings, and hash tables. Storage management. Elementary principles of software engineering. Abstract data types. Algorithms for sorting and searching. Introduction to the Java programming language.

Computer Science 61C, 001 – Fall 2014
SHIMON MICHAEL LUSTIG, DANIEL GARCIA
Machine Structures – The internal organization and operation of digital computers. Machine architecture, support for high-level languages (logic, arithmetic, instruction sequencing) and operating systems (I/O, interrupts, memory management, process switching). Elements of computer logic design. Tradeoffs involved in fundamental architectural design decisions.

Computer Science 70, 001 – Fall 2014
ANANT SAHAI
Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory – Logic, infinity, and induction; applications include undecidability and stable marriage problem. Modular arithmetic and GCDs; applications include primality testing and cryptography. Polynomials; examples include error correcting codes and interpolation. Probability including sample spaces, independence, random variables, law of large numbers; examples include load balancing, existence arguments, Bayesian inference.

Computer Science C149, 001 – Fall 2014
EDWARD A. LEE, ALBERTO SANGIOVANNI-VINCENTELLI
Introduction to Embedded Systems – This course introduces students to the basics of models, analysis tools, and control for embedded systems operating in real time. Students learn how to combine physical processes with computation. Topics include models of computation, control, analysis and verification, interfacing with the physical world, mapping to platforms, and distributed embedded systems. The course has a strong laboratory component, with emphasis on a semester-long sequence of projects.

Earth and Planetary Science C12, 001 – Fall 2014
GEOFFREY W. MARCY
The Planets – A tour of the mysteries and inner workings of our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do they orbit the sun the way they do? How do planets form, and what are they made of? Why do some bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes? What makes the Earth hospitable for life? Is the Earth a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This course will introduce basic physics, chemistry, and math to understand planets, moons, rings, comets, asteroids, atmospheres, and oceans. Understanding other worlds will help us save our own planet and help us understand our place in the universe.

Earth and Planetary Science C20, 001 – Fall 2014
RICHARD ALLEN
Earthquakes in Your Backyard – Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

East Asian Languages and Cultures 109, 001 – Fall 2014
JOHN R. WALLACE
History of the Culture of Tea in China and Japan – The course takes the traditions of tea in China and Japan as a way of viewing cultural similarities and differences between the two countries. It explores aesthetic, religious, and social aspects of China and Japan by showing how religion, philosophy, and the arts stimulated and were stimulated by the practice of the consumption of tea in social and ritualized contexts. Understanding the tea culture of these countries informs students of important and enduring aspects of both cultures, provides an opportunity to discuss the role of religion and art in social practice (and vice versa), provides a forum for cultural comparison and provides as well an example of the relationship between the two countries and Japanese methods of importing and naturalizing another country’s social practice.

Economics 1, 001 – Fall 2014
MARTHA OLNEY
Introduction to Economics – A survey of economics designed to give an overview of the field.

Economics 100B, 001 – Fall 2014
STEVEN A. WOOD
Economic Analysis–Macro – A study of the factors which determine national income, employment, and price levels, with attention to the effects of monetary and fiscal policy.

Economics 119, 001 – Fall 2014
DANIEL J. ACLAND
Psychology and Economics – This course presents psychological and experimental economics research demonstrating departures from perfect rationality, self-interest, and other classical assumptions of economics and explores ways that these departures can be mathematically modeled and incorporated into mainstream positive and normative economics. The course will focus on the behavioral evidence itself, especially on specific formal assumptions that capture the findings in a way that can be incorporated into economics. The implications of these new assumptions for theoretical and empirical economics will be explored.

Economics C3, 001 – Fall 2014
PETER BERCK
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Electrical Engineering 143, 001 – Fall 2014
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
Microfabrication Technology – Integrated circuit device fabrication and surface micromachining technology. Thermal oxidation, ion implantation, impurity diffusion, film deposition, expitaxy, lithography, etching, contacts and interconnections, and process integration issues. Device design and mask layout, relation between physical structure and electrical/mechanical performance. MOS transistors and poly-Si surface microstructures will be fabricated in the laboratory and evaluated.

Electrical Engineering 227BT, 001 – Fall 2014
LAURENT EL GHAOUI
Convex Optimization – Convex optimization is a class of nonlinear optimization problems where the objective to be minimized, and the constraints, are both convex. The course covers some convex optimization theory and algorithms, and describes various applications arising in engineering design, machine learning and statistics, finance, and operations research. The course includes laboratory assignments, which consist of hands-on experiments with the optimization software CVX, and a discussion section.

Electrical Engineering C149, 001 – Fall 2014
EDWARD A. LEE, ALBERTO SANGIOVANNI-VINCENTELLI
Introduction to Embedded Systems – This course introduces students to the basics of models, analysis tools, and control for embedded systems operating in real time. Students learn how to combine physical processes with computation. Topics include models of computation, control, analysis and verification, interfacing with the physical world, mapping to platforms, and distributed embedded systems. The course has a strong laboratory component, with emphasis on a semester-long sequence of projects.

Energy and Resources Group C200, 001 – Fall 2014
DANIEL M. KAMMEN
Energy and Society – Energy sources, uses, and impacts; an introduction to the technology, politics, economics, and environmental effects of energy in contemporary society. Energy and well-being; energy international perspective, origins, and character of energy crisis.

English 127, 001 – Fall 2014
CHARLES F. ALTIERI
Modern Poetry – British and American poetry: 1900 to the present.

Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C104, 001 – Fall 2014
WAYNE MARCUS GETZ
Modeling and Management of Biological Resources – Models of population growth, chaos, life tables, and Leslie matrix theory. Harvesting and exploitation theory. Methods for analyzing population interactions, predation, competition. Fisheries, forest stands, and insect pest management. Genetic aspects of population management. Mathematical theory based on simple difference and ordinary differential equations. Use of simulation packages on microcomputers (previous experience with computers not required).

Environmental Economics and Policy 145, 001 – Fall 2014
MICHAEL ANDERSON
Health and Environmental Economic Policy – This course introduces students to key issues and findings in the field of health and environmental economics. The first half of the course focuses on the theoreticl and statistical frameworks used to analyze instances of market failure in the provision of health and environmental goods. The second half focuses on policy-relevant empirical findings in the field.

Environmental Economics and Policy C1, 001 – Fall 2014
PETER BERCK
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Environmental Economics and Policy C115, 001 – Fall 2014
WAYNE MARCUS GETZ
Modeling and Management of Biological Resources – Models of population growth, chaos, life tables, and Leslie matrix theory. Harvesting and exploitation theory. Methods for analyzing population interactions, predation, competition. Fisheries, forest stands, and insect pest management. Genetic aspects of population management. Mathematical theory based on simple difference and ordinary differential equations. Use of simulation packages on microcomputers (previous experience with computers not required).

History 162A, 001 – Fall 2014
DAVID WETZEL
Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914 – This upper division course looks at the rise and fall of the European great powers from the Peace of Westphalia, traditionally perceived as the beginning of the modern states system, to the coming of the First World War, an era of state and empire building. Economic and technological trends are naturally part of the story as well as cultural, social, and political forces. At the same time, the course highlights the decisive influence of the shakers and movers–kings, emperors, and generals.

History 5, 001 – Fall 2014
THOMAS W. LAQUEUR
European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present – This course is an introduction to European history from around 1500 to the present. The central questions that it addresses are how and why Europe–a small, relatively poor, and politically fragmented place– became the motor of globalization and a world civilzation in its own right. Put differently how did western become an adjective that, for better and often for worse, stands in place of modern.

History C132B, 001 – Fall 2014
RICHARD CANDIDA SMITH
Intellectual History of the United States since 1865 – In this course we will be discussing key developments in U.S. thought since the middle of the nineteenth century, roughly beginning with the reception of Darwin. The broader story told in the class weaves together in the history of science and engineering, the arts and popular culture, philosophy, and education. Our goal is to trace how ideas, whether they are dominant, challenging, or look back, have affected the ways in which Americans live together. We will look at how intellectual life has empowered and expanded the capacity of Americans to understand their world and achieve goals more effectively. We will also consider how intellectual theories have contributed to inequality and injustice.

Industrial Engin and Oper Research 191, 001 – Fall 2014
NAEEM ZAFAR
Technology Entrepreneurship – This course explores key entrepreneurial concepts relevant to the high-technology world. Topics include the entrepreneurial perspective, start-up strategies, business idea evaluation, business plan writing, introduction to entrepreneurial finance and venture capital, managing growth, and delivering innovative products. This course prepares technical and business minded students for careers focused on entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, and high technology. Students undertake intensive study of actual business situations through rigorous case-study analysis. This course can not be used to fulfill any engineering requirement (engineering units, courses, technical electives, or otherwise).

Integrative Biology C13, 001 – Fall 2014
CHARLES MARSHALL, ELIOT QUATAERT
Origins: from the Big Bang to the Emergence of Humans – This course will cover our modern scientific understanding of origins, from the Big Bang to the formation of planets like Earth, evolution by natural selection, the genetic basis of evolution, and the emergence of humans. These ideas are of great intrinsic scientific importance and also have far reaching implications for other aspects of people’s lives (e.g., philosophical, religious, and political). A major theme will be the scientific method and how we know what we know.

Japanese 7A, 001 – Fall 2014
JOHN R. WALLACE
Introduction to Pre-Modern Japanese Literature and Culture – This course provides an overview of Japanese literature and cultural history, from the seventh to the 18th century.

Legal Studies 103, 001 – Fall 2014
DAVID LIEBERMAN
Theories of Law and Society – An historical examination of major interpretations of law, morals and social development, with special emphasis on the social thought of the 18th and 19th centuries and including the writings of Marx, Maine, Durkheim, Weber and other contemporary figures.

Letters and Science C70T, 001 – Fall 2014
GEOFFREY W. MARCY
The Planets – A tour of the mysteries and inner workings of our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do they orbit the sun the way they do? How do planets form, and what are they made of? Why do some bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes? What makes the Earth hospitable for life? Is the Earth a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This course will introduce basic physics, chemistry, and math to understand planets, moons, rings, comets, asteroids, atmospheres, and oceans. Understanding other worlds will help us save our own planet and help us understand our place in the universe.

Letters and Science C70Y, 001 – Fall 2014
RICHARD ALLEN
Earthquakes in Your Backyard – Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

Nuclear Engineering 101, 001 – Fall 2014
LEE A. BERNSTEIN
Nuclear Reactions and Radiation – Energetics and kinetics of nuclear reactions and radioactive decay, fission, fusion, and reactions of low-energy neutrons; properties of the fission products and the actinides; nuclear models and transition probabilities; interaction of radiation with matter.

Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology 10, 001 – Fall 2014
CHRIS VULPE, ROBERT RYAN
Introduction to Human Nutrition – This course provides an overview of digestion and metabolism of nutrients. Foods are discussed as a source of nutrients, and the evidence is reviewed as to the effects of nutrition on health. The emphasis of the course is on issues of current interest and on worldwide problems of food and nutrition. Students are required to record their own diet, calculate its composition, and evaluate its nutrient content in light of their particular needs.

Philosophy 3, 001 – Fall 2014
JOHN JOSEPH CAMPBELL
The Nature of Mind – Introduction to the philosophy of mind. Topics to be considered may include the relation between mind and body; the structure of action; the nature of desires and beliefs; the role of the unconscious.

Physics 7A, 001 – Fall 2014
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Mechanics and wave motion

Physics 7B, 001 – Fall 2014
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Heat, electricity, and magnetism.

Political Science 179, 001 – Fall 2014
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science – Political issues facing the state of California, the United States, or the international community.

Practice Of Art 8, 001 – Fall 2014
JOHN S. MCNAMARA
Introduction to Visual Thinking – A first course in the language, processes, and media of visual art. Course work will be organized around weekly lectures and studio problems that will introduce students to the nature of art making and visual thinking.

Psychology 160, 001 – Fall 2014
SERENA CHEN
Social Psychology – Survey of social psychology including interaction processes, small groups, attitudes and attitude change, and social problems.

Psychology C129, 001 – Fall 2014
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
Scientific Approaches to Consciousness – This course will examine the nature of human consciousness from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science. It will cover topics from the philosophy of mind, cognitive linguistics, neuroscience, psychology, and computational models.

Public Health 245, 001 – Fall 2014
LEXIN LI
Introduction to Multivariate Statistics – The following topics are discussed in the context of biomedical and biological application: multiple regression, loglinear models, discriminant analysis, principal components. Instruction in statistical computing is given in the laboratory session.

Public Policy C284, 001 – Fall 2014
DANIEL M. KAMMEN
Energy and Society – Energy sources, uses, and impacts; an introduction to the technology, politics, economics, and environmental effects of energy in contemporary society. Energy and well-being; energy international perspective, origins, and character of energy crisis.

Sociology 1, 001 – Fall 2014
ANN SWIDLER
Introduction to Sociology – Introduces students who are considering majoring in sociology to the basic topics, concepts, and principles of the discipline. This course is required for the major; 1 or any version of 3 is prerequisite for other sociology classes; students not considering a sociology major are directed to any version of 3.

Statistics 21, 001 – Fall 2014
FLETCHER H IBSER
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business – Descriptive statistics, probability models and related concepts, sample surveys, estimates, confidence intervals, tests of significance, controlled experiments vs. observational studies, correlation and regression.

Spring 2014
American Studies C132B, 001 – Spring 2014
RICHARD CANDIDA SMITH
Intellectual History of the United States since 1865 – In this course we will be discussing key developments in U.S. thought since the middle of the nineteenth century, roughly beginning with the reception of Darwin. The broader story told in the class weaves together in the history of science and engineering, the arts and popular culture, philosophy, and education. Our goal is to trace how ideas, whether they are dominant, challenging, or look back, have affected the ways in which Americans live together. We will look at how intellectual life has empowered and expanded the capacity of Americans to understand their world and achieve goals more effectively. We will also consider how intellectual theories have contributed to inequality and injustice.

Architecture 140, 001 – Spring 2014
GAIL S. BRAGER, STEFANO SCHIAVON
Energy and Environment – This course provides undergraduates and graduates with an introduction to issues of physical building performance including building thermodynamics, daylighting, and solar control. The course presents the fundamentals of building science while recongnizing the evolving nature of building technologies, energy efficiency, ecology, and responsible design. The course begins with a detailed explication of the thermal properties of materials, heat transfer through building assemblies, balance point temperature, solar geometry, and shading analysis. Students apply these principles later in the course to a design project. The latter part of the course also provides a survey of broader building science topics including mechanical system design, microclimate, and current developments in energy-efficient design.

Architecture 180AC, 001 – Spring 2014
JONATHAN S. SIMON, JILL H. STONER, VICTORIA ROBINSON, PATRICIA PENN HILDEN
Prison – Taking a broad interdisciplinary approach, this course embraces the longue duree of critical prison studies, questioning the shadows of normality that cloak mass incarceration both across the globe and, more particularly, in the contemporary United States. This course thus explores a series of visceral, unsettling juxtapositions: “freedom” and “slavery”; “citizenship” and “subjugation”; “marginalization” and “inclusion”, in each case explicating the ways that story making, political demagoguery, and racial, class, and sexual inequalities have wrought an untenable social condition.

Asian American Studies 132AC, 001 – Spring 2014
HATEM A BAZIAN
Islamophobia and Constructing Otherness – This course will examine and attempt to understand Islamophobia, as the most recently articulated principle of otherness and its implications domestically and globally. The course will also closely examine the ideological and epistemological frameworks employed in discourses of otherness, and the complex social, political, economic, gender-based, and religious forces entangled in its historical and modern reproduction.
Bioengineering 200, 002 – Spring 2014
KEVIN E. HEALY
The Graduate Group Introductory Seminar – An introduction to research in bioengineering including specific case studies and organization of this rapidly expanding and diverse field.

Biology 1A, 001 – Spring 2014
JENNIFER A DOUDNA, ANDREW DILLIN, GARY L. FIRESTONE, MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function.

Biology 1AL, 001 – Spring 2014
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1B, 001 – Spring 2014
LLOYD GOLDWASSER, GEORGE RODERICK, LEWIS J FELDMAN
General introduction to plant development, form, and function; population genetics, ecology, and evolution. Intended for students majoring in the biological sciences, but open to all qualified students.

Chemistry 1AL, 001 – Spring 2014
BRYAN KRANTZ
General Chemistry Laboratory – An experimental approach to chemical sciences with emphasis on developing fundamental, reproducible laboratory technique and a goal of understanding and achieving precision and accuracy in laboratory experiments. Proper use of laboratory equipment and standard wet chemical methods are practiced. Areas of investigations include chemical equilibria, spectroscopy, nanotechnology, green chemistry, and thermochemistry. Concurrent enrollment in 1A is recommended.

Cognitive Science C103, 001 – Spring 2014
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Computer Science 10, 001 – Spring 2014
DANIEL GARCIA
The Beauty and Joy of Computing – An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing. The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the world. How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.

Computer Science 162, 001 – Spring 2014
ANTHONY D. JOSEPH
Operating Systems and System Programming – Basic concepts of operating systems and system programming. Utility programs, subsystems, multiple-program systems. Processes, interprocess communication, and synchronization. Memory allocation, segmentation, paging. Loading and linking, libraries. Resource allocation, scheduling, performance evaluation. File systems, storage devices, I/O systems. Protection, security, and privacy.

Computer Science 61A, 001 – Spring 2014
PAUL HILFINGER
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs – Introduction to programming and computer science. This course exposes students to techniques of abstraction at several levels: (a) within a programming language, using higher-order functions, manifest types, data-directed programming, and message-passing; (b) between programming languages, using functional and rule-based languages as examples. It also relates these techniques to the practical problems of implementation of languages and algorithms on a von Neumann machine. There are several significant programming projects, programmed in a dialect of the LISP language.

Computer Science 61B, 001 – Spring 2014
JONATHAN SHEWCHUK
Data Structrues – Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays strings, and hash tables. Storage management. Elementary principles of software engineering. Abstract data types. Algorithms for sorting and searching. Introduction to the Java programming language.

Computer Science 61C, 001 – Spring 2014
DANIEL GARCIA
Machine Structures – The internal organization and operation of digital computers. Machine architecture, support for high-level languages (logic, arithmetic, instruction sequencing) and operating systems (I/O, interrupts, memory management, process switching). Elements of computer logic design. Tradeoffs involved in fundamental architectural design decisions.

East Asian Languages and Cultures 105, 001 – Spring 2014
JOHN R. WALLACE
Dynamics of Romantic Core Values in East Asian Premodern Literature and Contemporary Film – This course explores the representation of romantic love in East Asian cultures in both premodern and post-modern contexts. Students develop a better understanding of the similarities and differences in traditional values in three East Asian cultures by comparing how canonical texts of premodern China, Japan and Korea represent romantic relationship. They explore how these values sometimes provide a given framework for a narrative and sometimes provide the definition of transgressive acts. This is followed by the study of several contemporary East Asian films, giving the student the opportunity to explore how traditional values persist, change, or become nexus points of resistance in the complicated modern and post-modern milieu of East Asian cultures maintaining a national identity while exercising an international presence.
Economics 100B, 001 – Spring 2014
STEVEN A. WOOD
Economic Analysis–Macro – A study of the factors which determine national income, employment, and price levels, with attention to the effects of monetary and fiscal policy.
Economics 172, 001 – Spring 2014
EDWARD ANDREW MIGUEL
Case Studies in Economic Development – A detailed study of the problems of development in a selected geographical area in Asia or Africa or Latin America.

Economics C125, 001 – Spring 2014
DAVID ZILBERMAN
Environmental Economics – Theories of externalities and public goods applied to pollution and environmental policy. Trade-off between production and environmental amenities. Assessing nonmarket value of environmental amenities. Remediation and clean-up policies. Environment and development. Biodiversity management.
Economics C3, 001 – Spring 2014
ERIC VAN DUSEN
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Electrical Engineering 127, 001 – Spring 2014
LAURENT GHAOUI
Optimization Models in Engineering – This course offers an introduction to optimization models and their applications, ranging from machine learning and statistics to decision-making and control, with emphasis on numerically tractable problems, such as linear or constrained least-squares optimization.

Electrical Engineering 130, 001 – Spring 2014
SAYEEF SALAHUDDIN
Integrated-Circuit Devices – Overview of electronic properties of semiconductor. Metal-semiconductor contacts, pn junctions, bipolar transistors, and MOS field-effect transistors. Properties that are significant to device operation for integrated circuits. Silicon device fabrication technology.

Electrical Engineering 140, 001 – Spring 2014
VLADIMIR STOJANOVIC
Linear Integrated Circuits – Single and multiple stage transistor amplifiers. Operational amplifiers. Feedback amplifiers, 2-port formulation, source, load, and feedback network loading. Frequency response of cascaded amplifiers, gain-bandwidth exchange, compensation, dominant pole techniques, root locus. Supply and temperature independent biasing and references. Selected applications of analog circuits such as analog-to-digital converters, switched capacitor filters, and comparators. The laboratory builds on the concepts presented in the lectures and provides hands-on design experience and help with the use of computer aided design tools such as SPICE.

Engineering 45, 001 – Spring 2014
J. W. MORRRIS
Properties of Materials – Application of basic principles of physics and chemistry to the engineering properties of materials. Special emphasis devoted to relation between microstructure and the mechanical properties of metals, concrete, polymers, and ceramics, and the electrical properties of semiconducting materials. Sponsoring Department: Materials Science and Engineering

English 117S, 001 – Spring 2014
CHARLES F. ALTIERI
Shakespeare – Lectures on Shakespeare and reading of his best works.
Environ Sci, Policy, and Management 114, 001 – Spring 2014
JUSTIN S. BRASHARES
Wildlife Ecology – Introduction to wildlife ecology and its relationship to management programs. Includes population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization, followed by selected case studies.

Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C11, 001 – Spring 2014
LYNN HUNTSINGER
Americans and the Global Forest – This course challenges students to think about how individual and American consumer decisions affect forest ecosystems around the world. A survey course that highlights the consequences of different ways of thinking about the forest as a global ecosystem and as a source of goods like trees, water, wildlife, food, jobs, and services. The scientific tools and concepts that have guided management of the forest for the last 100 years, and the laws, rules, and informal institutions that have shaped use of the forests, are analyzed.
Environmental Economics and Policy C1, 001 – Spring 2014
ERIC VAN DUSEN
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Environmental Economics and Policy C101, 001 – Spring 2014
DAVID ZILBERMAN
Environmental Economics – Theories of externalities and public goods applied to pollution and environmental policy. Trade-off between production and environmental amenities. Assessing nonmarket value of environmental amenities. Remediation and clean-up policies. Environment and development. Biodiversity management.
Ethnic Studies 181AC, 001 – Spring 2014
JONATHAN S. SIMON, JILL H. STONER, VICTORIA ROBINSON, PATRICIA PENN HILDEN
Prison – Taking a broad interdisciplinary approach, this course embraces the longue duree of critical prison studies, questioning the shadows of normality that cloak mass incarceration both across the globe and, more particularly, in the contemporary United States. This course thus explores a series of visceral, unsettling juxtapositions: “freedom” and “slavery”; “citizenship” and “subjugation”; “marginalization” and “inclusion”, in each case explicating the ways that story making, political demagoguery, and racial, class, and sexual inequalities have wrought an untenable social condition.

Geography 130, 001 – Spring 2014
NATHAN F. SAYRE
Food and the Environment – How do human populations organize and alter natural resources and ecosystems to produce food? The role of agriculture in the world economy, national development, and environmental degradation in the Global North and the Global South. The origins of scarcity and abundance, population growth and migration, hunger, and poverty.
History 130B, 001 – Spring 2014
DANIEL SARGENT
The United States and the World Since 1945 – This course will explore U.S. relations with the external world since 1945. It will encompass the political and military interactions that constitute diplomatic history, but it will include other kinds of international and transnational encounters. The course will address themes including the struggle for a new world order after 1945; the Cold War’s advent, intensification, and ending; the onrush of globalization since the 1970s; and the search for a coherent foreign policy after the Cold War.
History 162B, 001 – Spring 2014
DAVID WETZEL
War and Peace: International Relations since 1914 – This course analyzes the turbulent transitions from the classical European balance of power system to the global multipolar system of today. The course explores the political, economic, ideological, and technological roots of international affairs. Among topics discussed are the two world wars, inter-war collective security,the Cold War, European integration, imperialism and de-colonization, the collapse of Communism, the Middle East conflict, the rise of China and Japan, and the post-1990 international order.
History C132B, 001 – Spring 2014
RICHARD CANDIDA SMITH
Intellectual History of the United States since 1865 – In this course we will be discussing key developments in U.S. thought since the middle of the nineteenth century, roughly beginning with the reception of Darwin. The broader story told in the class weaves together in the history of science and engineering, the arts and popular culture, philosophy, and education. Our goal is to trace how ideas, whether they are dominant, challenging, or look back, have affected the ways in which Americans live together. We will look at how intellectual life has empowered and expanded the capacity of Americans to understand their world and achieve goals more effectively. We will also consider how intellectual theories have contributed to inequality and injustice.

History C192, 001 – Spring 2014
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Information C103, 001 – Spring 2014
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

International and Area Studies 106, 001 – Spring 2014
MAXIMILIAN AUFFHAMMER
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory – This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of intermediate microeconomic theory. It covers a number of topics including consumer and demand theory, firm, production and cost theory, competitive market theory, imperfect competition, welfare economics, choice under uncertainty and information. All analysis conducted in the course relies on graphical and algebraic techniques.

Journalism C101, 001 – Spring 2014
MICHAEL K. POLLAN
Edible Education: The Rise and Future of the Food Movement – As a subject, food is multi-disciplinary, drawing on everything from economics and agronomy to sociology, anthropology, and the arts. Each week experts on organic agriculture, school lunch reform, food safety, animal welfare, hunger and food security, farm bill reform, farm-to-school efforts, urban agriculture, food sovereignty, local food economies, etc. will lecture on what their areas of expertise have to offer the food movement to help it define and achieve its goals.

Legal Studies 145, 001 – Spring 2014
ROBERT D. COOTER
Law and Economics I – The course will apply microeconomic theory analysis to legal rules and procedures. Emphasis will be given to the economic consequences of various sorts of liability rules, remedies for breach of contract and the allocation of property rights. The jurisprudential significance of the analysis will be discussed.
Legal Studies 185AC, 001 – Spring 2014
JONATHAN S. SIMON, JILL H. STONER, VICTORIA ROBINSON, PATRICIA PENN HILDEN
Prison – Taking a broad interdisciplinary approach, this course embraces the longue duree of critical prison studies, questioning the shadows of normality that cloak mass incarceration both across the globe and, more particularly, in the contemporary United States. This course thus explores a series of visceral, unsettling juxtapositions: “freedom” and “slavery”; “citizenship” and “subjugation”; “marginalization” and “inclusion”, in each case explicating the ways that story making, political demagoguery, and racial, class, and sexual inequalities have wrought an untenable social condition.

Letters and Science C101, 001 – Spring 2014
MICHAEL K. POLLAN
Edible Education: The Rise and Future of the Food Movement – As a subject, food is multi-disciplinary, drawing on everything from economics and agronomy to sociology, anthropology, and the arts. Each week experts on organic agriculture, school lunch reform, food safety, animal welfare, hunger and food security, farm bill reform, farm-to-school efforts, urban agriculture, food sovereignty, local food economies, etc. will lecture on what their areas of expertise have to offer the food movement to help it define and achieve its goals.

Letters and Science C30U, 001 – Spring 2014
LYNN HUNTSINGER
Americans and the Global Forest – This course challenges students to think about how individual and American consumer decisions affect forest ecosystems around the world. A survey course that highlights the consequences of different ways of thinking about the forest as a global ecosystem and as a source of goods like trees, water, wildlife, food, jobs, and services. The scientific tools and concepts that have guided management of the forest for the last 100 years, and the laws, rules, and informal institutions that have shaped use of the forests, are analyzed.
Letters and Science C70V, 001 – Spring 2014
YURY G KOLOMENSKY
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Mathematics 10B, 001 – Spring 2014
PER-OLOF PERSSON
Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics – Elementary combinatorics and discrete probability theory. Introduction to graphs, matrix algebra, linear equations, difference equations, and differential equations.

Mathematics 128A, 001 – Spring 2014
PER-OLOF PERSSON
Numerical Analysis – Programming for numerical calculations, round-off error, approximation and interpolation, numerical quadrature, and solution of ordinary differential equations. Practice on the computer.

Mechanical Engineering 233, 001 – Spring 2014
XU CHEN
Advanced Control Systems II – Linear Quadratic Optimal Control, Stochastic State Estimation, Linear Quadratic Gaussian Problem, Loop Transfer Recovery, Adaptive Control and Model Reference Adaptive Systems, Self Tuning Regulators, Repetitive Control, Application to engineering systems.

Media Studies C104C, 001 – Spring 2014
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology 11, 001 – Spring 2014
CHRISTOPHER D. VULPE, DANIEL NOMURA
Introduction to Toxicology – Discussion of principles for the evaluation of toxic hazard of natural and man-made substances present in the environment, the workplace, food, drink, and drugs. The bases for species selectivity, individual variations in sensitivity and resistance, and the combined effects of toxic agents will be addressed. Issues related to the impact of toxic agents in modern society will be emphasized.

Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology 193, 001 – Spring 2014
ISAO KUBO
Introduction to Research in Toxicology – Students will be asked to prepare an oral and written report on a topic selected from the current research literature in toxicology.
Peace and Conflict Studies 94, 001 – Spring 2014
AMERIC AZEVEDO
Theory and Practice of Meditation – A practicum using a modern method for systematically reducing random activity in the mind, with comparative studies of relevant texts from monastic and householder traditions, East and West.
Philosophy 135, 001 – Spring 2014
JOHN JOSEPH CAMPBELL
Theory of Meaning – Language as social behavior. Language compared to other sign systems. The foundations of semantics, truth, meaning, reference. Issues of logical form in belief sentences, indirect discourse, sentences about causality, events, actions. Relations between thought and language.

Physics 137A, 001 – Spring 2014
RUZA MARKOV
Quantum Mechanics – Introduction to the methods of quantum mechanics with applications to atomic, molecular, solid state, nuclear and elementary particle physics.
Physics 137A, 002 – Spring 2014
RUZA MARKOV
Quantum Mechanics – Introduction to the methods of quantum mechanics with applications to atomic, molecular, solid state, nuclear and elementary particle physics.
Physics 7B, 001 – Spring 2014
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Heat, electricity, and magnetism.
Physics 8B, 002 – Spring 2014
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Introductory Physics – Introduction to electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, and modern physics. The course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics C10, 001 – Spring 2014
YURY G KOLOMENSKY
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Political Science 109J, 001 – Spring 2014
JOSHUA A. GREEN
Special Topics in American Politics
Political Science 179, 001 – Spring 2014
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science – Political issues facing the state of California, the United States, or the international community.

Psychology 131, 001 – Spring 2014
STEPHEN HINSHAW
Developmental Psychopathology – This course will discuss linkages between developmental processes and child psychopathology. Included will be discussion of cognitive impairments in children, including learning disabilities and mental retardation; internalizing disorders, such as anxiety, withdrawal, and depression; externalizing disorders, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder; and child abuse and neglect. Psychobiological, familial, legal, and societal factors will be emphasized.

Psychology 140, 001 – Spring 2014
ALISON GOPNIK
Developmental Psychology – This course explores the development of children from birth to adolescence, in a wide range of areas including biological, cognitive, linguistic, social, and personality development. It also covers the effects of genes, experience, and social context on children’s development.

Psychology 164, 001 – Spring 2014
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
Social Cognition – Surveys empirical and theoretical approaches to our understanding of perception, memory, thought, and language concerning ourselves, other people, interpersonal behavior, and the situations in which social interaction takes place. Emphasis is placed on the integration of problems in social, personality, and clinical psychology with the concepts and principles employed in the study of nonsocial cognition.

Public Health 112, 001 – Spring 2014
ARTHUR L. REINGOLD
Global Health: A Multidisciplinary Examination – This course examines health at the individual and community/global level by examining the interplay of many factors, including the legal, social, political, and physical environments; economic forces; access to food, safe water, sanitation, and affordable preventive/medical care; nutrition; cultural beliefs and human behaviors; and religion; among others. Students will be expected to read, understand, and use advanced materials from diverse disciplines. Class accompanied by case-based discussions.
Public Health 142, 001 – Spring 2014
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Introduction to Probability and Statistics in Biology and Public Health – Descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square, correlation and regression with biomedical applications.
Public Health 241, 001 – Spring 2014
NICHOLAS P. JEWELL
Statistical Analysis of Categorical Data – Biostatistical concepts and modeling relevant to the design and analysis of multifactor population-based cohort and case-control studies, including matching. Measures of association, causal inference, confounding interaction. Introduction to binary regression, including logistic regression.

Sociology 102, 001 – Spring 2014
MICHAEL BURAWOY
Sociological Theory II – Second half of a year-long course on the history of social thought as a source of present-day problems and hypotheses.
Statistics 131A, 001 – Spring 2014
SHOBHANA STOYANOV
Statistical Inferences for Social and Life Scientists – Ideas for estimation and hypothesis testing basic to applications, including an introduction to probability. Linear estimation and normal regression theory.

Fall 2013
Agricultural and Resource Economics 213, 001 – Fall 2013
MICHAEL ANDERSON
Applied Econometrics – Standard and advanced econometric techniques are applied to topics in agriculture and resource economics. Techniques include limited dependent variables, time series analysis, and nonparametric analysis. Students will use computers to conduct statistical analyses.
Anthropology 124A, 001 – Fall 2013
PATRICK V. KIRCH
Archaeology of the South Pacific – Selected topics and research problems in the archaeology of the southern Pacific from prehistory through to the establishment of complex chiefdoms in many locales. Stress on current issues and interpretations.
Bioengineering 200, 002 – Fall 2013
KEVIN E. HEALY
The Graduate Group Introductory Seminar – An introduction to research in bioengineering including specific case studies and organization of this rapidly expanding and diverse field.

Biology 1A, 001 – Fall 2013
MARKUS PAULY, MICHAEL MEIGHAN, ROBERT L. FISCHER, DAVID A. WEISBLAT
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function.

Biology 1AL, 001 – Fall 2013
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1B, 001 – Fall 2013
ALAN SHABEL, BRUCE G. BALDWIN, JOHN P. HUELSENBECK
General introduction to plant development, form, and function; population genetics, ecology, and evolution. Intended for students majoring in the biological sciences, but open to all qualified students.

Computer Science 162, 001 – Fall 2013
ANTHONY D. JOSEPH
Operating Systems and System Programming – Basic concepts of operating systems and system programming. Utility programs, subsystems, multiple-program systems. Processes, interprocess communication, and synchronization. Memory allocation, segmentation, paging. Loading and linking, libraries. Resource allocation, scheduling, performance evaluation. File systems, storage devices, I/O systems. Protection, security, and privacy.

Computer Science 169, 001 – Fall 2013
DAVID PATTERSON, ARMANDO FOX
Software Engineering – Ideas and techniques for designing, developing, and modifying large software systems. Function-oriented and object-oriented modular design techniques, designing for re-use and maintainability. Specification and documentation. Verification and validation. Cost and quality metrics and estimation. Project team organization and management. Students will work in teams on a substantial programming project.

Computer Science 170, 001 – Fall 2013
SATISH B RAO
Efficient Algorithms and Intractable Problems – Concept and basic techniques in the design and analysis of algorithms; models of computation; lower bounds; algorithms for optimum search trees, balanced trees and UNION-FIND algorithms; numerical and algebraic algorithms; combinatorial algorithms. Turing machines, how to count steps, deterministic and nondeterministic Turing machines, NP-completeness. Unsolvable and intractable problems.

Computer Science 294, 073 – Fall 2013
PHILLIP COLELLA
Special Topics – Software Engineering for Scientific Computing

Computer Science 61A, 001 – Fall 2013
JOHN S. DENERO
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs – Introduction to programming and computer science. This course exposes students to techniques of abstraction at several levels: (a) within a programming language, using higher-order functions, manifest types, data-directed programming, and message-passing; (b) between programming languages, using functional and rule-based languages as examples. It also relates these techniques to the practical problems of implementation of languages and algorithms on a von Neumann machine. There are several significant programming projects, programmed in a dialect of the LISP language.

Computer Science 61B, 001 – Fall 2013
PAUL HILFINGER
Data Structrues – Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays strings, and hash tables. Storage management. Elementary principles of software engineering. Abstract data types. Algorithms for sorting and searching. Introduction to the Java programming language.

Computer Science 70, 001 – Fall 2013
UMESH VAZIRANI
Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory – Logic, infinity, and induction; applications include undecidability and stable marriage problem. Modular arithmetic and GCDs; applications include primality testing and cryptography. Polynomials; examples include error correcting codes and interpolation. Probability including sample spaces, independence, random variables, law of large numbers; examples include load balancing, existence arguments, Bayesian inference.

Earth and Planetary Science C20, 001 – Fall 2013
RICHARD ALLEN
Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

East Asian Languages and Cultures 109, 001 – Fall 2013
JOHN R. WALLACE
History of the Culture of Tea in China and Japan – The course takes the traditions of tea in China and Japan as a way of viewing cultural similarities and differences between the two countries. It explores aesthetic, religious, and social aspects of China and Japan by showing how religion, philosophy, and the arts stimulated and were stimulated by the practice of the consumption of tea in social and ritualized contexts. Understanding the tea culture of these countries informs students of important and enduring aspects of both cultures, provides an opportunity to discuss the role of religion and art in social practice (and vice versa), provides a forum for cultural comparison and provides as well an example of the relationship between the two countries and Japanese methods of importing and naturalizing another country’s social practice.
Economics 119, 001 – Fall 2013
DANIEL J. ACLAND
Psychology and Economics – This course presents psychological and experimental economics research demonstrating departures from perfect rationality, self-interest, and other classical assumptions of economics and explores ways that these departures can be mathematically modeled and incorporated into mainstream positive and normative economics. The course will focus on the behavioral evidence itself, especially on specific formal assumptions that capture the findings in a way that can be incorporated into economics. The implications of these new assumptions for theoretical and empirical economics will be explored.

Economics C3, 001 – Fall 2013
ERIC VAN DUSEN
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Electrical Engineering 130, 001 – Fall 2013
TSU-JAE LIU
Integrated-Circuit Devices – Overview of electronic properties of semiconductor. Metal-semiconductor contacts, pn junctions, bipolar transistors, and MOS field-effect transistors. Properties that are significant to device operation for integrated circuits. Silicon device fabrication technology.

Electrical Engineering 140, 001 – Fall 2013
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
Linear Integrated Circuits – Single and multiple stage transistor amplifiers. Operational amplifiers. Feedback amplifiers, 2-port formulation, source, load, and feedback network loading. Frequency response of cascaded amplifiers, gain-bandwidth exchange, compensation, dominant pole techniques, root locus. Supply and temperature independent biasing and references. Selected applications of analog circuits such as analog-to-digital converters, switched capacitor filters, and comparators. Hardware laboratory and design project.

Engineering 92, 001 – Fall 2013
FIONA DOYLE
Perspectives in Engineering – This series of lectures provides students, especially undeclared Engineering students, with information on the various engineering disciplines to guide them toward choice of major. Lecturers describe research activities, how they made their own career choices, and indicate future opportunities. Recommended for all Engineering Science students and required for Engineering undeclared students.
Environ Sci, Policy, and Management 117 Lab, 101 – Fall 2013
MIGUEL A. ALTIERI
Urban Garden Ecosystems – An ecosystem approach to the study of urban gardens with an organic perspective. Topics include fundamentals of horticulture, soil properties and fertility, pest and disease management, and food perservation. Laboratories include methods in garden design, plant propagation, compost technique, soil preparation, irrigation systems, pest management, individual or group projects, demonstrations, and discussions.

Environ Sci, Policy, and Management 117, 001 – Fall 2013
MIGUEL A. ALTIERI
Urban Garden Ecosystems – An ecosystem approach to the study of urban gardens with an organic perspective. Topics include fundamentals of horticulture, soil properties and fertility, pest and disease management, and food perservation. Laboratories include methods in garden design, plant propagation, compost technique, soil preparation, irrigation systems, pest management, individual or group projects, demonstrations, and discussions.

Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C104, 001 – Fall 2013
WAYNE MARCUS GETZ
Modeling and Management of Biological Resources – Models of population growth, chaos, life tables, and Leslie matrix theory. Harvesting and exploitation theory. Methods for analyzing population interactions, predation, competition. Fisheries, forest stands, and insect pest management. Genetic aspects of population management. Mathematical theory based on simple difference and ordinary differential equations. Use of simulation packages on microcomputers (previous experience with computers not required).

Environmental Economics and Policy C1, 001 – Fall 2013
ERIC VAN DUSEN
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Environmental Economics and Policy C115, 001 – Fall 2013
WAYNE MARCUS GETZ
Modeling and Management of Biological Resources – Models of population growth, chaos, life tables, and Leslie matrix theory. Harvesting and exploitation theory. Methods for analyzing population interactions, predation, competition. Fisheries, forest stands, and insect pest management. Genetic aspects of population management. Mathematical theory based on simple difference and ordinary differential equations. Use of simulation packages on microcomputers (previous experience with computers not required).

History 162A, 001 – Fall 2013
DAVID WETZEL
Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914 – This upper division course looks at the rise and fall of the European great powers from the Peace of Westphalia, traditionally perceived as the beginning of the modern states system, to the coming of the First World War, an era of state and empire building. Economic and technological trends are naturally part of the story as well as cultural, social, and political forces. At the same time, the course highlights the decisive influence of the shakers and movers–kings, emperors, and generals.
Japanese 7A, 001 – Fall 2013
JOHN R. WALLACE
Introduction to Pre-Modern Japanese Literature and Culture – This course provides an overview of Japanese literature and cultural history, from the seventh to the 18th century.
Letters and Science 120C, 001 – Fall 2013
RONALD HENDEL
Arts and Literature – This upper division course features significant engagement with arts, literature or language, either through critical study of works of art or through the creation of art. Art enables us to see the familiar world with new, often questioning eyes, and makes distant times and places, characters, and issues come alive in our imagination, which is essential to almost all intellectual endeavor. The Arts and Literature breadth requirement is intended to provide students with knowledge and appreciation of the creative arts so that, for the duration of their lives, engagement with art can be, variously, a wellspring of creativity, a lodestar for critical perspectives, and a touchstone of aesthetic quality–in sum, a continuing source of learning and serious pleasure.

Letters and Science C70V, 001 – Fall 2013
BOB JACOBSEN
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Mathematics 135, 001 – Fall 2013
LEO A. HARRINGTON
Introduction to the Theory of Sets – Set-theoretical paradoxes and means of avoiding them. Sets, relations, functions, order and well-order. Proof by transfinite induction and definitions by transfinite recursion. Cardinal and ordinal numbers and their arithmetic. Construction of the real numbers. Axiom of choice and its consequences.
Mathematics 16A, 002 – Fall 2013
THOMAS SCANLON
Analytic Geometry and Calculus – This sequence is intended for majors in the life and social sciences. Calculus of one variable; derivatives, definite integrals and applications, maxima and minima, and applications of the exponential and logarithmic functions.

Mathematics 16B, 001 – Fall 2013
JAMES W DEMMEL
Analytic Geometry and Calculus – Continuation of 16A. Application of integration of economics and life sciences. Differential equations. Functions of many variables. Partial derivatives, constrained and unconstrained optimization.
Molecular and Cell Biology 32, 001 – Fall 2013
TERRY MACHEN, ROBIN BALL
Introduction to Human Physiology – A comprehensive introduction to human cell biology. The course will concentrate on basic mechanisms underlying human life processes, including cells and membranes; nerve and muscle function; cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and gastrointestinal physiology; metabolism, endocrinology, and reproduction.
Molecular and Cell Biology 32L, 001 – Fall 2013
ROBIN BALL
Introduction to Human Physiology Laboratory – Experiments and demonstrations are designed to amplify and reinforce information presented in 32. Exercises include investigations into the structure and function of muscle, nerve, cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, endocrine, and blood systems.
Nuclear Engineering 101, 001 – Fall 2013
ERIC B. NORMAN
Nuclear Reactions and Radiation – Energetics and kinetics of nuclear reactions and radioactive decay, fission, fusion, and reactions of low-energy neutrons; properties of the fission products and the actinides; nuclear models and transition probabilities; interaction of radiation with matter.

Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology 10, 001 – Fall 2013
CHRIS VULPE, ROBERT RYAN
Introduction to Human Nutrition – This course provides an overview of digestion and metabolism of nutrients. Foods are discussed as a source of nutrients, and the evidence is reviewed as to the effects of nutrition on health. The emphasis of the course is on issues of current interest and on worldwide problems of food and nutrition. Students are required to record their own diet, calculate its composition, and evaluate its nutrient content in light of their particular needs.

Philosophy 132, 001 – Fall 2013
JOHN R. SEARLE
Philosophy of Mind – Mind and matter; other minds; the concept “person.”
Philosophy 3, 001 – Fall 2013
JOHN JOSEPH CAMPBELL
The Nature of Mind – Introduction to the philosophy of mind. Topics to be considered may include the relation between mind and body; the structure of action; the nature of desires and beliefs; the role of the unconscious.

Physics 151, 001 – Fall 2013
DMITRY BUDKER
Elective Physics: Special Topics – Topics vary from semester to semester. The subject matter level and scope of the course are such that it is acceptable as the required elective course in the Physics major.

Physics 7A, 001 – Fall 2013
STEVEN W. STAHLER
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Mechanics and wave motion
Physics 7C, 001 – Fall 2013
RUZA MARKOV
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Electromagnetic waves, optics, relativity, and quantum physics.
Physics 8A, 001 – Fall 2013
MARJORIE D SHAPIRO
Introductory Physics – Introduction to forces, kinetics, equilibria, fluids, waves, and heat. This course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics 8A, 002 – Fall 2013
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Introductory Physics – Introduction to forces, kinetics, equilibria, fluids, waves, and heat. This course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics 8B, 001 – Fall 2013
MELVIN POMERANTZ
Introductory Physics – Introduction to electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, and modern physics. The course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.

Physics 8B, 002 – Fall 2013
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Introductory Physics – Introduction to electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, and modern physics. The course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics C10, 001 – Fall 2013
BOB JACOBSEN
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Political Science 179, 001 – Fall 2013
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science – Political issues facing the state of California, the United States, or the international community.
Practice Of Art 8, 001 – Fall 2013
JOHN S. MCNAMARA
Introduction to Visual Thinking – A first course in the language, processes, and media of visual art. Course work will be organized around weekly lectures and studio problems that will introduce students to the nature of art making and visual thinking.

Psychology 1, 001 – Fall 2013
CHRISTOPHER GADE
General Psychology – Introduction to the principal areas, problems, and concepts of psychology. This course is required for the major; students not considering a psychology major are directed to 2.

Psychology 130, 001 – Fall 2013
ANN M. KRING
Clinical Psychology – Theoretical and empirical approaches to the explanation of psychological dysfunction. The relation between theories of psychopathology and theories of intervention. A critical evaluation of the effects of individual, family, and community approaches to therapeutic and preventive intervention. Thematic focus of the course may change from year to year. See department notices for details.

Public Health 245, 001 – Fall 2013
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Introduction to Multivariate Statistics – The following topics are discussed in the context of biomedical and biological application: multiple regression, loglinear models, discriminant analysis, principal components. Instruction in statistical computing is given in the laboratory session.
Public Health 250A, 001 – Fall 2013
ARTHUR L. REINGOLD
Epidemiologic Methods I – Principles and methods of epidemiology: study design, selection, and definition of cases and controls; sampling, data collection, analysis, and inference. Discussion session provides an opportunity to apply methods to problem sets and to discuss issues presented in lectures.

Public Health 250B, 001 – Fall 2013
JENNIFER AHERN
Epidemiologic Methods II – This course is intended as an intermediate level course in the field of epidemiology. Topics include causal inference; measurement of disease rates; inferential reasoning; and research study designs including ecologic, case-control, cohort, intervention trials, and meta-analytic designs (potential sources of bias, confounding, and effect modification in each research design are explored in depth); topics in clinical epidemiology including the use of likelihood ratios, receiver operator curves, and the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value of a test; and a brief introduction to logistic regression, survival analysis, and decision analysis. The readings from this course are drawn primarily from advanced epidemiology textbooks (Kleinbuam, Rothman, Miettinen).

Sociology 101, 001 – Fall 2013
MICHAEL BURAWOY
Sociological Theory I – First half of a year-long course on the history of social thought as a source of present-day problems and hypotheses.
Statistics 133, 002 – Fall 2013
FLETCHER H IBSER
Concepts in Computing with Data – An introduction to computationally intensive applied statistics. Topics will include organization and use of databases, visualization and graphics, statistical learning and data mining, model validation procedures, and the presentation of results.

Spring 2013
African American Studies 107, 001 – Spring 2013
RONALD WILLIAMS
Race and Public Policy – This course examines the formation and implementation of public policies directly relevant to the black community. While the policies analyzed differ from year to year, basic public policy methodology will be introduced each year.

Anthropology 1, 001 – Spring 2013
TERRENCE W. DEACON
Introduction to Biological Anthropology – An introduction to human evolution. Physical and behavioral adaptations of humans and their prehistoric and living relatives. Issues in evolutionary theory, molecular evolution, primate behavior, interpretation of fossils. Prehistoric activities, racial differences, genetic components of behavior are defined and evaluated.
Asian American Studies 132AC, 001 – Spring 2013
HATEM A BAZIAN
Islamophobia and Constructing Otherness – This course will examine and attempt to understand Islamophobia, as the most recently articulated principle of otherness and its implications domestically and globally. The course will also closely examine the ideological and epistemological frameworks employed in discourses of otherness, and the complex social, political, economic, gender-based, and religious forces entangled in its historical and modern reproduction.
Bioengineering 200, 002 – Spring 2013
KEVIN E. HEALY
The Graduate Group Introductory Seminar – An introduction to research in bioengineering including specific case studies and organization of this rapidly expanding and diverse field.

Biology 1A, 001 – Spring 2013
JENNIFER A DOUDNA, NIPAM PATEL, GARY L. FIRESTONE, MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function.

Biology 1AL, 001 – Spring 2013
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1B, 001 – Spring 2013
ALAN SHABEL, GEORGE RODERICK, LEWIS J FELDMAN
General introduction to plant development, form, and function; population genetics, ecology, and evolution. Intended for students majoring in the biological sciences, but open to all qualified students.

Cognitive Science C102, 001 – Spring 2013
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
Scientific Approaches to Consciousness – This course will examine the nature of human consciousness from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science. It will cover topics from the philosophy of mind, cognitive linguistics, neuroscience, psychology, and computational models.

Cognitive Science C103, 001 – Spring 2013
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Computer Science 10, 001 – Spring 2013
DANIEL GARCIA
The Beauty and Joy of Computing – An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing. The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the world. How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.
Computer Science 162, 001 – Spring 2013
ANTHONY D. JOSEPH
Operating Systems and System Programming – Basic concepts of operating systems and system programming. Utility programs, subsystems, multiple-program systems. Processes, interprocess communication, and synchronization. Memory allocation, segmentation, paging. Loading and linking, libraries. Resource allocation, scheduling, performance evaluation. File systems, storage devices, I/O systems. Protection, security, and privacy.

Computer Science 194, 024 – Spring 2013
JOHN KUBIATOWICZ
Special Topics – Advanced Operating Systems Structures and Implementation

Computer Science 61A, 001 – Spring 2013
AMIR ASHRAF KAMIL
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs – Introduction to programming and computer science. This course exposes students to techniques of abstraction at several levels: (a) within a programming language, using higher-order functions, manifest types, data-directed programming, and message-passing; (b) between programming languages, using functional and rule-based languages as examples. It also relates these techniques to the practical problems of implementation of languages and algorithms on a von Neumann machine. There are several significant programming projects, programmed in a dialect of the LISP language.

Computer Science 61B, 001 – Spring 2013
JONATHAN SHEWCHUK
Data Structrues – Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays strings, and hash tables. Storage management. Elementary principles of software engineering. Abstract data types. Algorithms for sorting and searching. Introduction to the Java programming language.

Computer Science 61C, 001 – Spring 2013
DANIEL GARCIA
Machine Structures – The internal organization and operation of digital computers. Machine architecture, support for high-level languages (logic, arithmetic, instruction sequencing) and operating systems (I/O, interrupts, memory management, process switching). Elements of computer logic design. Tradeoffs involved in fundamental architectural design decisions.
Economics 100B, 001 – Spring 2013
STEVEN A. WOOD
Economic Analysis–Macro – A study of the factors which determine national income, employment, and price levels, with attention to the effects of monetary and fiscal policy.
Economics 113, 001 – Spring 2013
MARTHA OLNEY
American Economic History A survey of trends in the American economy; emphasis on factors explaining economic growth and on the changing distribution of the gains and losses associated with growth

Economics 174, 001 – Spring 2013
EDWARD ANDREW MIGUEL
Global Poverty and Impact Evaluation – Rather than simply describing the causes and symptoms of global poverty, this course will explore the variety of tools available for rigorously measuring the impact of development programs. Through weekly case studies of field research, the course will cover impact evaluation theory and methods. The course will culminate with a final project in which each student will design an impact evaluation of a policy or intervention.

Economics 2, 001 – Spring 2013
JOSEPH W. H. LOUGH
Introduction to Economics–Lecture Format – The course provides a survey of economics principles and methods. It covers both microeconomics, the study of consumer choice, firm behavior, and market interaction, and macroeconomics, the study of economic growth, unemployment, and inflation. Special emphasis is placed on the application of economic tools to contemporary economic problems and policies. Economics 2 differs from Economics 1 in that it has an additional hour of lecture per week and can thus cover topics in greater depth. It is particularly appropriate for intended economics majors.
Economics 274, 001 – Spring 2013
EDWARD ANDREW MIGUEL
Global Poverty and Impact Evaluation – Rather than simply describing the causes and symptoms of global poverty, this course will explore the variety of tools available for rigorously measuring the impact of development programs. Through weekly case studies of field research, the course will cover impact evaluation theory and methods. The course will culminate with a final project in which each student will design an impact evaluation of a policy or intervention.

Education 182AC, 001 – Spring 2013
LISA GARCIA BEDOLLA
The Politics of Educational Inequality – This course explores the state of U.S. public education, particularly how success within that system varies by race, class, and gender. It explores educational attainment across different groups within the U.S. and then looks at how the structure of educational policymaking affects different types of students. It concludes by investigating the varied impact of different approaches to reform, with an eye toward identifying how best to reduce educational inequality in the United States.

Electrical Engineering 105, 001 – Spring 2013
SAYEEF SALAHUDDIN
Microelectronic Devices and Circuits – This course covers the fundamental circuit and device concepts needed to understand analog integrated circuits. After an overview of the basic properties of semiconductors, the p-n junction and MOS capacitors are described and the MOSFET is modeled as a large-signal device. Two port small-signal amplifiers and their realization using single stage and multistage CMOS building blocks are discussed. Sinusoidal steady-state signals are introduced and the techniques of phasor analysis are developed, including impedance and the magnitude and phase response of linear circuits. The frequency responses of single and multi-stage amplifiers are analyzed. Differential amplifiers are introduced.

Energy and Resources Group 280, 001 – Spring 2013
RICHARD B. NORGAARD
Ecological Economics in Historical Context – Economists through history have explored economic and environmental interactions, physical limits to growth, what constitutes the good life, and how economic justice can be assured. Yet economists continue to use measures and models that simplify these issues and promote bad outcomes. Ecological economics responds to this tension between the desire for simplicity and the multiple perspectives needed to understand complexity in order to move toward sustainable, fulfilling, just economies.

Energy and Resources Group C180, 001 – Spring 2013
RICHARD B. NORGAARD
Ecological Economics in Historical Context – Economists through history have explored economic and environmental interactions, physical limits to growth, what constitutes the good life, and how economic justice can be assured. Yet economists continue to use measures and models that simplify these issues and promote bad outcomes. Ecological economics responds to this tension between the desire for simplicity and the multiple perspectives needed to understand complexity in order to move toward sustainable, fulfilling, just economies.

English 127, 001 – Spring 2013
CHARLES F. ALTIERI
Modern Poetry – British and American poetry: 1900 to the present.
Environ Sci, Policy, and Management 114, 001 – Spring 2013
JUSTIN S. BRASHARES
Wildlife Ecology – Introduction to wildlife ecology and its relationship to management programs. Includes population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization, followed by selected case studies.

Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C11, 001 – Spring 2013
LYNN HUNTSINGER
Americans and the Global Forest – This course challenges students to think about how individual and American consumer decisions affect forest ecosystems around the world. A survey course that highlights the consequences of different ways of thinking about the forest as a global ecosystem and as a source of goods like trees, water, wildlife, food, jobs, and services. The scientific tools and concepts that have guided management of the forest for the last 100 years, and the laws, rules, and informal institutions that have shaped use of the forests, are analyzed.
Environmental Economics and Policy C180, 001 – Spring 2013
RICHARD B. NORGAARD
Ecological Economics in Historical Context – Economists through history have explored economic and environmental interactions, physical limits to growth, what constitutes the good life, and how economic justice can be assured. Yet economists continue to use measures and models that simplify these issues and promote bad outcomes. Ecological economics responds to this tension between the desire for simplicity and the multiple perspectives needed to understand complexity in order to move toward sustainable, fulfilling, just economies.

Geography 130, 001 – Spring 2013
NATHAN F. SAYRE
Food and the Environment – How do human populations organize and alter natural resources and ecosystems to produce food? The role of agriculture in the world economy, national development, and environmental degradation in the Global North and the Global South. The origins of scarcity and abundance, population growth and migration, hunger, and poverty.
History 151C, 001 – Spring 2013
JAMES VERNON
The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-2000 – For many years, Britain was seen as the crucible of the modern world. This small, cold, and wet island was thought to have been the first to develop representative democracy, an industrial economy, rapid transport, mass cities, mass communication and mass culture, and, of course, an empire upon which the sun famously never set. And yet, despite this precocious modernity, imperial Britain remained a deeply traditional society unable to rid itself of ancient institutions like the monarchy, the aristocracy, and the established church. The focus of the course is on how this combination of the old and the new produced a broadly liberal set of mentalities through which Britons came to understand and manage the great transformations of modern life, both at home and across the empire.

History 158B, 001 – Spring 2013
DAVID WETZEL
Europe in the 19th Century.
History 5, 001 – Spring 2013
THOMAS W. LAQUEUR
European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present – This course is an introduction to European history from around 1500 to the present. The central questions that it addresses are how and why Europe–a small, relatively poor, and politically fragmented place– became the motor of globalization and a world civilzation in its own right. Put differently how did western become an adjective that, for better and often for worse, stands in place of modern.

History C192, 001 – Spring 2013
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Information C103, 001 – Spring 2013
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Legal Studies 103, 001 – Spring 2013
DAVID LIEBERMAN
Theories of Law and Society – An historical examination of major interpretations of law, morals and social development, with special emphasis on the social thought of the 18th and 19th centuries and including the writings of Marx, Maine, Durkheim, Weber and other contemporary figures.
Letters and Science C30U, 001 – Spring 2013
LYNN HUNTSINGER
Americans and the Global Forest – This course challenges students to think about how individual and American consumer decisions affect forest ecosystems around the world. A survey course that highlights the consequences of different ways of thinking about the forest as a global ecosystem and as a source of goods like trees, water, wildlife, food, jobs, and services. The scientific tools and concepts that have guided management of the forest for the last 100 years, and the laws, rules, and informal institutions that have shaped use of the forests, are analyzed.
Letters and Science C70V, 001 – Spring 2013
CARLOS J. BUSTAMANTE
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Mathematics 16B, 001 – Spring 2013
JAMES W DEMMEL
Analytic Geometry and Calculus – Continuation of 16A. Application of integration of economics and life sciences. Differential equations. Functions of many variables. Partial derivatives, constrained and unconstrained optimization.
Mathematics 1A, 001 – Spring 2013
SLOBODAN SIMIC
Calculus – This sequence is intended for majors in engineering and the physical sciences. An introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, with applications and an introduction to transcendental functions.
Mechanical Engineering 102A, 001 – Spring 2013
ALBERT PISANO
Introduction to Mechanical Systems for Mechatronics – Design, rapid prototyping, assembly, test, and evaluation of mechanical components and sub-systems used in mechatronic systems. Laboratory and mechatronic instrumentation. Design and optimization of beams and chassis. Two- and three-position synthesis of positioning mechanisms. Planar indexing via mechanical linkages. Rotary motion-conversion via cam-follower mechanisms. Crank-slider mechanisms for function generation. Permanent and temporary fasteners. Fabrication of actual prototypical devices.
Mechanical Engineering 106, 001 – Spring 2013
OMER SAVA
Fluid Mechanics – This course introduces the fundamentals and techniques of fluid mechanics with the aim of describing and controlling engineering flows.

Media Studies 104A, 001 – Spring 2013
WILLIAM B. TURNER
Freedom of Speech and the Press – The course considers the history and contemporary meaning of the First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and the press. Emphasizing the real world implications of major Supreme Court decisions, the course examines restrictions on speech and press imposed by national security, libel, injurious speech, and privacy, as well as issues of access to information and government regulation of new media.

Media Studies C104C, 001 – Spring 2013
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Near Eastern Studies 15, 001 – Spring 2013
DANA D. DEPIETRO, MARGARET LARKIN
Introduction to Near Eastern Art and Archaeology – The ancient Near East (present-day Iran, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Israel, and Turkey) is considered the cradle of civilization. Here in Mesopotamia and its neighboring regions, the first cities arose, writing was invented, armies forged the earliest empires, and complex religious beliefs were expressed in art and architecture. This course surveys the major archaeological sites and monuments from the earliest settlements to the conquest of the Near East by Alexander the Great in 330 BCE.

Philosophy 132, 001 – Spring 2013
JOHN R. SEARLE
Philosophy of Mind – Mind and matter; other minds; the concept “person.”
Physics 7A, 001 – Spring 2013
STEVEN W. STAHLER
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Mechanics and wave motion
Physics 7A, 002 – Spring 2013
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Mechanics and wave motion
Physics 7A, 003 – Spring 2013
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Mechanics and wave motion
Physics 7B, 002 – Spring 2013
CATHERINE BORDEL
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Heat, electricity, and magnetism.
Physics 8A, 001 – Spring 2013
TRISTAN LAINE SMITH
Introductory Physics – Introduction to forces, kinetics, equilibria, fluids, waves, and heat. This course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics 8A, 002 – Spring 2013
MICHAEL DEWEESE
Introductory Physics – Introduction to forces, kinetics, equilibria, fluids, waves, and heat. This course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.

Physics 8B, 001 – Spring 2013
JOEL FAJANS
Introductory Physics – Introduction to electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, and modern physics. The course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics 8B, 002 – Spring 2013
JOEL FAJANS
Introductory Physics – Introduction to electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, and modern physics. The course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics C10, 001 – Spring 2013
CARLOS J. BUSTAMANTE
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Political Science 149F, 001 – Spring 2013
YAACOV YADGAR
Special Topics in Area Studies

Political Science 179, 001 – Spring 2013
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science – Political issues facing the state of California, the United States, or the international community.
Practice Of Art 8, 001 – Spring 2013
JOHN S. MCNAMARA
Introduction to Visual Thinking – A first course in the language, processes, and media of visual art. Course work will be organized around weekly lectures and studio problems that will introduce students to the nature of art making and visual thinking.

Psychology 131, 001 – Spring 2013
STEPHEN HINSHAW
Developmental Psychopathology – This course will discuss linkages between developmental processes and child psychopathology. Included will be discussion of cognitive impairments in children, including learning disabilities and mental retardation; internalizing disorders, such as anxiety, withdrawal, and depression; externalizing disorders, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder; and child abuse and neglect. Psychobiological, familial, legal, and societal factors will be emphasized.
Psychology 140, 001 – Spring 2013
ALISON GOPNIK
Developmental Psychology – This course explores the development of children from birth to adolescence, in a wide range of areas including biological, cognitive, linguistic, social, and personality development. It also covers the effects of genes, experience, and social context on children’s development.

Psychology C129, 001 – Spring 2013
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
Scientific Approaches to Consciousness – This course will examine the nature of human consciousness from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science. It will cover topics from the philosophy of mind, cognitive linguistics, neuroscience, psychology, and computational models.

Public Health 145, 001 – Spring 2013
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Statistical Analysis of Continuous Outcome Data – Regression models for continuous outcome data: least squares estimates and their properties, interpreting coefficients, prediction, comparing models, checking model assumptions, transformations, outliers, and influential points. Categorical explanatory variables: interaction and analysis of covariance, correlation and partial correlation. Appropriate graphical methods and statistical computing. Analysis of variance for one- and two-factor models: F tests, assumption checking, multiple comparisons. Random effects models and variance components. Introduction to repeated measures models.
Public Health 241, 001 – Spring 2013
NICHOLAS P. JEWELL
Statistical Analysis of Categorical Data – Biostatistical concepts and modeling relevant to the design and analysis of multifactor population-based cohort and case-control studies, including matching. Measures of association, causal inference, confounding interaction. Introduction to binary regression, including logistic regression.

Public Health C242C, 001 – Spring 2013
ALAN HUBBARD
Longitudinal Data Analysis – The course covers the statistical issues surrounding estimation of effects using data on subjects followed through time. The course emphasizes a regression model approach and discusses disease incidence modeling and both continuous outcome data/linear models and longitudinal extensions to nonlinear models (e.g., logistic and Poisson). The primary focus is from the analysis side, but mathematical intuition behind the procedures will also be discussed. The statistical/mathematical material includes some survival analysis, linear models, logistic and Poisson regression, and matrix algebra for statistics. The course will conclude with an introduction to recently developed causal regression techniques (e.g., marginal structural models). Time permitting, serially correlated data on ecological units will also be discussed.

Statistics 155, 001 – Spring 2013
ELCHANAN MOSSEL
Game Theory – General theory of zero-sum, two-person games, including games in extensive form and continuous games, and illustrated by detailed study of examples.
Statistics C247C, 001 – Spring 2013
ALAN HUBBARD
Longitudinal Data Analysis – The course covers the statistical issues surrounding estimation of effects using data on subjects followed through time. The course emphasizes a regression model approach and discusses disease incidence modeling and both continuous outcome data/linear models and longitudinal extensions to nonlinear models (e.g., logistic and Poisson). The primary focus is from the analysis side, but mathematical intuition behind the procedures will also be discussed. The statistical/mathematical material includes some survival analysis, linear models, logistic and Poisson regression, and matrix algebra for statistics. The course will conclude with an introduction to recently developed causal regression techniques (e.g., marginal structural models). Time permitting, serially correlated data on ecological units will also be discussed.

Fall 2012
Agricultural and Resource Economics 213, 001 – Fall 2012
MICHAEL ANDERSON
Applied Econometrics – Standard and advanced econometric techniques are applied to topics in agriculture and resource economics. Techniques include limited dependent variables, time series analysis, and nonparametric analysis. Students will use computers to conduct statistical analyses.
Asian American Studies 128AC, 001 – Fall 2012
HATEM A BAZIAN
Muslims in America – The course traces Islam’s journey in America. It will deal with the emergence of identifiable Muslim communities throughout the U.S. and focus on patterns of migration, the ethnic makeup of such communities, gender dynamics, political identity, and cases of conversion to Islam. The course will spend considerable time on the African American, Indo-Pakistani, and Arab American Muslim communities since they constitute the largest groupings. It also examines in depth the emergence of national, regional, and local Muslim institutions, patterns of development pursued by a number of them, and levels of cooperation or antagonism. The course seeks an examination of gender relations and dynamics across the various Muslim groupings, and the internal and external factors that contribute to real and imagined crisis. The course seeks to conduct and document the growth and expansion of mosques, schools, and community centers in the greater Bay Area. Finally, no class on Islam in America would be complete without a critical examination of the impacts of 9/11 on Muslim communities, the erosion of civil rights, and the ongoing war on terrorism.
Bioengineering 200, 002 – Fall 2012
VARIOUS SPEAKERS
The Graduate Group Introductory Seminar – An introduction to research in bioengineering including specific case studies and organization of this rapidly expanding and diverse field.

Biology 1A, 001 – Fall 2012
MARKUS PAULY, MICHAEL MEIGHAN, ROBERT L. FISCHER, DAVID A. WEISBLAT
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function.

Biology 1AL, 001 – Fall 2012
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1B, 001 – Fall 2012
ALAN SHABEL, MIKE MOSER, BRUCE G. BALDWIN, JOHN P. HUELSENBECK
General introduction to plant development, form, and function; population genetics, ecology, and evolution. Intended for students majoring in the biological sciences, but open to all qualified students.

Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering 150B, 001 – Fall 2012
ALEXIS T. BELL
Transport and Separation Processes – Principles of mass transfer with application to chemical processes. Diffusion and convection. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer; mass transfer coefficients. Design of staged and continuous separations processes.

Chemistry 1A, 001 – Fall 2012
ANGELICA STACY
Stoichiometry of chemical reactions, quantum mechanical description of atoms, the elements and periodic table, chemical bonding, real and ideal gases, thermochemistry, introduction to thermodynamics and equilibrium, acid-base and solubility equilibria, introduction to oxidation-reduction reactions, introduction to chemical kinetics.

Chemistry 3B, 002 – Fall 2012
K. PETER VOLLHARDT
Chemical Structure and Reactivity – Conjugation, aromatic chemistry, carbonyl compounds, carbohydrates, amines, carboxylic acids, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acid chemistry. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and mass spectrometry will be introduced.

Civil and Environmental Engineering 100, 001 – Fall 2012
MARK T STACEY
Elementary Fluid Mechanics – Fluid statics and dynamics, including laboratory experiments with technical reports. Fundamentals: integral and differential formulations of the conservation laws are solved in special cases such as boundary layers and pipe flow. Flow visualization and computation techniques are introduced using Matlab. Empirical equations are used for turbulent flows, drag, pumps, and open channels. Principles of empirical equations are also discussed: dimensional analysis, regression, and uncertainty.
Computer Science 10, 001 – Fall 2012
DANIEL GARCIA
The Beauty and Joy of Computing – An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing. The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the world. How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.

Computer Science 162, 001 – Fall 2012
ION STOICA
Operating Systems and System Programming – Basic concepts of operating systems and system programming. Utility programs, subsystems, multiple-program systems. Processes, interprocess communication, and synchronization. Memory allocation, segmentation, paging. Loading and linking, libraries. Resource allocation, scheduling, performance evaluation. File systems, storage devices, I/O systems. Protection, security, and privacy.

Computer Science 169, 001 – Fall 2012
DAVID PATTERSON, ARMANDO FOX
Software Engineering – Ideas and techniques for designing, developing, and modifying large software systems. Function-oriented and object-oriented modular design techniques, designing for re-use and maintainability. Specification and documentation. Verification and validation. Cost and quality metrics and estimation. Project team organization and management. Students will work in teams on a substantial programming project.

Computer Science 184, 001 – Fall 2012
RAVI RAMAMOORTHI
Foundations of Computer Graphics – Techniques of modeling objects for the purpose of computer rendering: boundary representations, constructive solids geometry, hierarchical scene descriptions. Mathematical techniques for curve and surface representation. Basic elements of a computer graphics rendering pipeline; architecture of modern graphics display devices. Geometrical transformations such as rotation, scaling, translation, and their matrix representations. Homogeneous coordinates, projective and perspective transformations. Algorithms for clipping, hidden surface removal, rasterization, and anti-aliasing. Scan-line based and ray-based rendering algorithms. Lighting models for reflection, refraction, transparency.

Computer Science 61A, 001 – Fall 2012
JOHN S. DENERO
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs – Introduction to programming and computer science. This course exposes students to techniques of abstraction at several levels: (a) within a programming language, using higher-order functions, manifest types, data-directed programming, and message-passing; (b) between programming languages, using functional and rule-based languages as examples. It also relates these techniques to the practical problems of implementation of languages and algorithms on a von Neumann machine. There are several significant programming projects, programmed in a dialect of the LISP language.

Computer Science 61B, 001 – Fall 2012
PAUL HILFINGER
Data Structrues – Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays strings, and hash tables. Storage management. Elementary principles of software engineering. Abstract data types. Algorithms for sorting and searching. Introduction to the Java programming language.

Computer Science 70, 001 – Fall 2012
UMESH VAZIRANI
Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory – Logic, infinity, and induction; applications include undecidability and stable marriage problem. Modular arithmetic and GCDs; applications include primality testing and cryptography. Polynomials; examples include error correcting codes and interpolation. Probability including sample spaces, independence, random variables, law of large numbers; examples include load balancing, existence arguments, Bayesian inference.

Earth and Planetary Science C20, 001 – Fall 2012
RICHARD ALLEN
Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

Economics 100B, 001 – Fall 2012
STEVEN A. WOOD
Economic Analysis–Macro – A study of the factors which determine national income, employment, and price levels, with attention to the effects of monetary and fiscal policy.
Economics 140, 001 – Fall 2012
GLENN A. WOROCH
Economic Statistics and Econonmetrics – Introduction to problems of observation, estimation, and hypothesis testing in economics. This course covers the linear regression model and its application to empirical problems in economics.

Economics C3, 001 – Fall 2012
PETER BERCK
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Electrical Engineering 100, 001 – Fall 2012
VIVEK SUBRAMANIAN
Electronic Techniques for Engineering – This course serves as an introduction to the principles of electrical engineering, starting from the basic concepts of voltage and current and circuit elements of resistors, capacitors, and inductors.

Electrical Engineering 105, 001 – Fall 2012
BERNHARD E. BOSER
Microelectronic Devices and Circuits – This course covers the fundamental circuit and device concepts needed to understand analog integrated circuits. After an overview of the basic properties of semiconductors, the p-n junction and MOS capacitors are described and the MOSFET is modeled as a large-signal device. Two port small-signal amplifiers and their realization using single stage and multistage CMOS building blocks are discussed. Sinusoidal steady-state signals are introduced and the techniques of phasor analysis are developed, including impedance and the magnitude and phase response of linear circuits. The frequency responses of single and multi-stage amplifiers are analyzed. Differential amplifiers are introduced.

Electrical Engineering 130, 001 – Fall 2012
SAYEEF SALAHUDDIN
Integrated-Circuit Devices – Overview of electronic properties of semiconductor. Metal-semiconductor contacts, pn junctions, bipolar transistors, and MOS field-effect transistors. Properties that are significant to device operation for integrated circuits. Silicon device fabrication technology.

Electrical Engineering 230M, 001 – Fall 2012
SAYEEF SALAHUDDIN
Integrated-Circuit Devices – Overview of electronic properties of semiconductor. Metal-semiconductor contacts, pn junctions, bipolar transistors, and MOS field-effect transistors. Properties that are significant to device operation for integrated circuits. Silicon device fabrication technology.

Electrical Engineering 42, 001 – Fall 2012
VIVEK SUBRAMANIAN
Electronic Techniques for Engineering – This course serves as an introduction to the principles of electrical engineering, starting from the basic concepts of voltage and current and circuit elements of resistors, capacitors, and inductors.

Electrical Engineering C245, 001 – Fall 2012
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
Physics, fabrication, and design of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). Micro and nanofabrication processes, including silicon surface and bulk micromachining and non-silicon micromachining. Integration strategies and assembly processes. Microsensor and microactuator devices: electrostatic, piezoresistive, piezoelectric, thermal, magnetic transduction. Electronic position-sensing circuits and electrical and mechanical noise. CAD for MEMS.

English 45C – Fall 2012
CHARLES F. ALTIERI
Literature in English – Historical survey of literature in English from Chaucer through the 20th century. A. Literature in English through Milton. B. Literature in English from the late-17th through the mid-19th century. C. Literature in English from the mid-19th through the 20th century.
Environmental Economics and Policy 145, 001 – Fall 2012
MICHAEL ANDERSON
Health and Environmental Economic Policy – This course introduces students to key issues and findings in the field of health and environmental economics. The first half of the course focuses on the theoreticl and statistical frameworks used to analyze instances of market failure in the provision of health and environmental goods. The second half focuses on policy-relevant empirical findings in the field.

Environmental Economics and Policy C1, 001 – Fall 2012
PETER BERCK
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Geography 10 – Fall 2012
NATHAN F. SAYRE
World Regions, Peoples, and States – This course will provide a framework for recognizing and analyzing the major distinctive regions of the world in comparative context. The most important interrelations between environment, economy, ethnicity, and the national identity and viability of states will be explored.
History 124A, 001 – Fall 2012
RICHARD CANDIDA SMITH
The United States from the Late 19th Century to the Eve of World War II – During the first half-century before World War II, the United States became an industrialized, urban society with national markets and communication media. This class will explore in depth some of the most important changes and how they were connected. We will also examine what did not change, and how state and local priorities persisted in many arenas. Among the topics addressed: population movements and efforts to control immigration; the growth of corporations and trade unions; the campaign for women’s suffrage; Prohibition; an end to child labor; the institution of the Jim Crow system; and the reshaping of higher education.

History 162A, 001 – Fall 2012
DAVID WETZEL
Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914 – This upper division course looks at the rise and fall of the European great powers from the Peace of Westphalia, traditionally perceived as the beginning of the modern states system, to the coming of the First World War, an era of state and empire building. Economic and technological trends are naturally part of the story as well as cultural, social, and political forces. At the same time, the course highlights the decisive influence of the shakers and movers–kings, emperors, and generals.
International and Area Studies 106, 001 – Fall 2012
MAXIMILIAN AUFFHAMMER
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory – This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of intermediate microeconomic theory. It covers a number of topics including consumer and demand theory, firm, production and cost theory, competitive market theory, imperfect competition, welfare economics, choice under uncertainty and information. All analysis conducted in the course relies on graphical and algebraic techniques.

International and Area Studies 206, 001 – Fall 2012
MAXIMILIAN AUFFHAMMER
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory – This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of intermediate microeconomic theory. It covers a number of topics including consumer and demand theory, firm, production and cost theory, competitive market theory, imperfect competition, welfare economics, choice under uncertainty and information. All analysis conducted in the course relies on graphical and algebraic techniques.

Japanese 7A, 001 – Fall 2012
JOHN R. WALLACE
Introduction to Pre-Modern Japanese Literature and Culture – This course provides an overview of Japanese literature and cultural history, from the seventh to the 18th century.
Journalism C103, 001 – Fall 2012
MICHAEL K. POLLAN
Edible Education: Telling Stories About Food and Agriculture – As the costs of our industrialized food system become impossible to ignore, a national debate over the future of food and farming has begun. Telling stories about where food comes from, how it is produced (and might be produced differently) plays a critical role in bringing attention to the issues and shifting politics. Each week a prominent figure in this debate explores what can be done to make the food system healthier more equitable, more sustainable, and the role of storytelling in the process.

Legal Studies 145, 001 – Fall 2012
ROBERT D. COOTER
Law and Economics I – The course will apply microeconomic theory analysis to legal rules and procedures. Emphasis will be given to the economic consequences of various sorts of liability rules, remedies for breach of contract and the allocation of property rights. The jurisprudential significance of the analysis will be discussed.
Legal Studies 163, 001 – Fall 2012
FRANKLIN ZIMRIN
Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Justice – This course examines the premises, doctrine, and operational behavior of juvenile courts, particularly in relation to the commission of seriously anti-social acts by mid-adolescents. Topics include the history of theories of delinquency; the jurisprudence of delinquency; the incidence and severity of delinquency; police response to juvenile offenders; the processes of juvenile courts and youth corrections; and reforms or alternatives to the juvenile court system.

Letters and Science C103, 001 – Fall 2012
MICHAEL K. POLLAN
Edible Education: Telling Stories About Food and Agriculture – As the costs of our industrialized food system become impossible to ignore, a national debate over the future of food and farming has begun. Telling stories about where food comes from, how it is produced (and might be produced differently) plays a critical role in bringing attention to the issues and shifting politics. Each week a prominent figure in this debate explores what can be done to make the food system healthier more equitable, more sustainable, and the role of storytelling in the process.

Letters and Science C70V, 001 – Fall 2012
YURY G KOLOMENSKY
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Letters and Science C70Y, 001 – Fall 2012
RICHARD ALLEN
Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

Mathematics 128A, 001 – Fall 2012
PER-OLOF PERSSON
Numerical Analysis – Programming for numerical calculations, round-off error, approximation and interpolation, numerical quadrature, and solution of ordinary differential equations. Practice on the computer.
Mathematics 16B, 001 – Fal 2012
JON WILKENING
Analytic Geometry and Calculus – Continuation of 16A. Application of integration of economics and life sciences. Differential equations. Functions of many variables. Partial derivatives, constrained and unconstrained optimization.
Mathematics 1A, 003 – Fall 2012
SLOBODAN SIMIC
Calculus – This sequence is intended for majors in engineering and the physical sciences. An introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, with applications and an introduction to transcendental functions.
Mechanical Engineering 220, 001 – Fall 2012
ATHULAN VIJAYARAGHAVAN
Precision Manufacturing – Introduction to precision engineering for manufacturing. Emphasis on design and performance of precision machinery for manufacturing. Topics include machine tool elements and structure, sources of error (thermal, static, dynamic, process related), precision machining processes and process models (diamond turning and abrasive (fixed and free) processes), sensors for process monitoring and control, metrology, actuators, machine design case studies and examples of precision component manufacture.

Mechanical Engineering C218, 001 – Fall 2012
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
Physics, fabrication, and design of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). Micro and nanofabrication processes, including silicon surface and bulk micromachining and non-silicon micromachining. Integration strategies and assembly processes. Microsensor and microactuator devices: electrostatic, piezoresistive, piezoelectric, thermal, magnetic transduction. Electronic position-sensing circuits and electrical and mechanical noise. CAD for MEMS.

Molecular and Cell Biology 104, 001 – Fall 2012
MICHAEL B. EISEN, CRAIG MILLER, MATTHEW D. WELCH
Genetics, Genomics, and Cell Biology – This course will introduce students to key concepts in genetic analysis, eukaryotic cell biology, and state-of-the-art approaches in genomic medicine. Lectures will highlight basic knowledge of cellular processes with the basis for human diseases, particularly cancer. Prerequisite courses will have introduced students to the concepts of cells, the central dogma of molecular biology, and gene regulation. Emphasis in this course will be on eukaryotic cell processes, including cellular organization, dynamics, and signaling.
Molecular and Cell Biology 110, 001 – Fall 2012
QIANG ZHOU, KATHLEEN COLLINS, EVA NOGALES
Molecular Biology: Macromolecular Synthesis and Cellular Function – Molecular biology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their viruses. Mechanisms of DNA replication, transcription, translation. Structure of genes and chromosomes. Regulation of gene expression. Biochemical processes and principles in membrane structure and function, intracellular trafficking and subcellular compartmentation, cytoskeletal architecture, nucleocytoplasmic transport, signal transduction mechanisms, and cell cycle control.
Molecular and Cell Biology 32, 001 – Fall 2012
TERRY MACHEN, ROBIN BALL
Introduction to Human Physiology – A comprehensive introduction to human cell biology. The course will concentrate on basic mechanisms underlying human life processes, including cells and membranes; nerve and muscle function; cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and gastrointestinal physiology; metabolism, endocrinology, and reproduction.
Molecular and Cell Biology 32L, 001 – Fall 2012
ROBIN BALL
Introduction to Human Physiology Laboratory – Experiments and demonstrations are designed to amplify and reinforce information presented in 32. Exercises include investigations into the structure and function of muscle, nerve, cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, endocrine, and blood systems.
Nuclear Engineering 101, 001 – Fall 2012
ERIC B. NORMAN
Nuclear Reactions and Radiation – Energetics and kinetics of nuclear reactions and radioactive decay, fission, fusion, and reactions of low-energy neutrons; properties of the fission products and the actinides; nuclear models and transition probabilities; interaction of radiation with matter.

Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology 103, 001 – Fall 2012
DANICA CHEN, HEI SOOK SUL
Nutrient Function and Metabolism – Delivery of nutrients from foods to mammalian cells; major metabolic pathways; function of nutrients in energy metabolism, nitrogen and lipid metabolism, structural tissues and regulation; essentiality, activation, storage, excretion, and toxicity of nutrients.
Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology 166, 001 – Fall 2012
BETHANY HENDRICKSON, MARIAH LAFLEUR
Nutrition in the Community – This course addresses basic nutrition in the context of the community. It explores nutrition programs that serve various segments of the population and the relationships of these programs to nutrition policy at the local, national, and international levels. Community assessment is used as the basis for program planning, implementation, and evaluation. The specific needs of population groups (infants, children, women, and the elderly) are considered and questions of food security are investigated.
Philosophy 135, 001 – Fall 2012
JOHN JOSEPH CAMPBELL
Theory of Meaning – Language as social behavior. Language compared to other sign systems. The foundations of semantics, truth, meaning, reference. Issues of logical form in belief sentences, indirect discourse, sentences about causality, events, actions. Relations between thought and language.

Philosophy 3, 001 – Fall 2012
JOHN JOSEPH CAMPBELL
The Nature of Mind – Introduction to the philosophy of mind. Topics to be considered may include the relation between mind and body; the structure of action; the nature of desires and beliefs; the role of the unconscious.

Physics 7B, 001 – Fall 2012
CATHERINE BORDEL
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Heat, electricity, and magnetism.
Physics 7B, 002 – Fall 2012
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Heat, electricity, and magnetism.
Physics 7B, 003 – Fall 2012
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Heat, electricity, and magnetism.
Physics 8A, 001 – Fall 2012
MARJORIE D. SHAPIRO
Introductory Physics – Introduction to forces, kinetics, equilibria, fluids, waves, and heat. This course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics 8A, 002 – Fall 2012
MICHAEL DEWEESE
Introductory Physics – Introduction to forces, kinetics, equilibria, fluids, waves, and heat. This course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics 8B, 002 – Fall 2012
MELVIN POMERANTZ
Introductory Physics – Introduction to electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, and modern physics. The course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics C10, 001 – Fall 2012
YURY G KOLOMENSKY
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Physics H7C, 001 – Fall 2012
TRISTAN LAINE SMITH
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Honors sequence corresponding to 7A-7B-7C, but with a greater emphasis on theory as opposed to problem solving. Recommended for those students who have had advanced Physics on the high school level and who are intending to declare a major in physics. Entrance into H7A is decided on the basis of performance on an examination given during the first week of class or the consent of the instructor, and into H7B-H7C on performance in previous courses in a standard sequence.

Political Science 179, 001 – Fall 2012
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science – Political issues facing the state of California, the United States, or the international community.
Psychology 130, 001 – Fall 2012
ANN M. KRING
Clinical Psychology – Theoretical and empirical approaches to the explanation of psychological dysfunction. The relation between theories of psychopathology and theories of intervention. A critical evaluation of the effects of individual, family, and community approaches to therapeutic and preventive intervention. Thematic focus of the course may change from year to year. See department notices for details.
Psychology 2, 002 – Fall 2012
DAVID WHITNEY, MATTHEW P. WALKER
Principles of Psychology – An overview of psychology for students who will not major in the field. This course satisfies the prerequisite for upper division decade courses.
Public Health 200C2, 001 – Fall 2012
KIRK R. SMITH
Environmental Health Sciences – This course will give an introduction to the major human and natural activities that lead to release of hazardous materials into the environment as well as the causal links between chemical, physical, and biological hazards in the environment and their impact on human health, including those related to climate change. The basic principles of toxicology, exposure assessment, risk assessment, risk perception, and environmental health policy will be presented. The overall role of environmental risks in the pattern of human disease, both nationally and internationally, will be covered.

Public Health 200C2, 101 – Fall 2012
Discussion for Public Health 200C2.

Public Health 245, 001 – Fall 2012
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Introduction to Multivariate Statistics – The following topics are discussed in the context of biomedical and biological application: multiple regression, loglinear models, discriminant analysis, principal components. Instruction in statistical computing is given in the laboratory session.
Public Health 250A, 001 – Fall 2012
ARTHUR L. REINGOLD
Epidemiologic Methods I – Principles and methods of epidemiology: study design, selection, and definition of cases and controls; sampling, data collection, analysis, and inference. Discussion session provides an opportunity to apply methods to problem sets and to discuss issues presented in lectures.

Public Health 250B, 001 – Fall 2012
JACK COLFORD
Epidemiologic Methods II – This course is intended as an intermediate level course in the field of epidemiology. Topics include causal inference; measurement of disease rates; inferential reasoning; and research study designs including ecologic, case-control, cohort, intervention trials, and meta-analytic designs (potential sources of bias, confounding, and effect modification in each research design are explored in depth); topics in clinical epidemiology including the use of likelihood ratios, receiver operator curves, and the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value of a test; and a brief introduction to logistic regression, survival analysis, and decision analysis. The readings from this course are drawn primarily from advanced epidemiology textbooks (Kleinbuam, Rothman, Miettinen).

Public Health 290, 001 – Fall 2012
JACK COLFORD, PAUL J. GERTLER
Health Issues Seminars – A discussion of current developments and issues in public health of interest to faculty and students of the department as a whole. Content varies from semester to semester depending upon current issues and interests.

Sociology 1, 001 – Fall 2012
ANN SWIDLER
Introduction to Sociology – Introduces students who are considering majoring in sociology to the basic topics, concepts, and principles of the discipline. This course is required for the major; 1 or any version of 3 is prerequisite for other sociology classes; students not considering a sociology major are directed to any version of 3.

Statistics 133, 001 – Fall 2012
FLETCHER H IBSER
Concepts in Computing with Data – An introduction to computationally intensive applied statistics. Topics will include organization and use of databases, visualization and graphics, statistical learning and data mining, model validation procedures, and the presentation of results.
Statistics 2, 001 – Fall 2012
FLETCHER H IBSER
Introduction to Statistics – Population and variables. Standard measures of location, spread and association. Normal approximation. Regression. Probability and sampling. Binomial distribution. Interval estimation. Some standard significance tests.
Spring 2012
American Studies 10AC, 001 – Spring 2012
MICHAEL COHEN
Introduction to American Studies – American culture and cultural change, with attention to the multicultural basis of American society and emphasis on the need for multiple methods of analysis. The course will consistently draw on the arts, material culture, and various fields affecting cultural production and meaning. Those areas include literature, film, history, architecture, history of art, religion, music, engineering, environmental studies, anthropology, politics, economics, law, and medicine.

Anthropology 1, 001 – Spring 2012
TERRENCE W. DEACON
Introduction to Biological Anthropology – An introduction to human evolution. Physical and behavioral adaptations of humans and their prehistoric and living relatives. Issues in evolutionary theory, molecular evolution, primate behavior, interpretation of fossils. Prehistoric activities, racial differences, genetic components of behavior are defined and evaluated.
Asian American Studies 132AC, 001 – Spring 2012
HATEM A BAZIAN
Islamophobia and Constructing Otherness – This course will examine and attempt to understand Islamophobia, as the most recently articulated principle of otherness and its implications domestically and globally. The course will also closely examine the ideological and epistemological frameworks employed in discourses of otherness, and the complex social, political, economic, gender-based, and religious forces entangled in its historical and modern reproduction.
Astronomy 250, 001 – Spring 2012
JOSHUA SIMON BLOOM
Special Topics in Astrophysics – Topics will vary from semester to semester. See department for announcements.

Biology 1A, 001 – Spring 2012
RICHARD MALKIN, GARY L. FIRESTONE, MICHAEL MEIGHAN, FYODOR URNOV
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function.

Biology 1AL, 001 – Spring 2012
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1B, 001 – Spring 2012
GEORGE RODERICK, CRAIG MORITZ, LEWIS J FELDMAN, MIKE MOSER
General introduction to plant development, form, and function; population genetics, ecology, and evolution. Intended for students majoring in the biological sciences, but open to all qualified students.

Chemistry 1A, 002 – Spring 2012
HEINO NITSCHE
General Chemistry – Stoichiometry of chemical reactions, quantum mechanical description of atoms, the elements and periodic table, chemical bonding, real and ideal gases, thermochemistry, introduction to thermodynamics and equilibrium, acid-base and solubility equilibria, introduction to oxidation-reduction reactions, introduction to chemical kinetics.

Chemistry 3AL, 001 – Spring 2012
JOSHUA DEITCH
Organic Chemistry Laboratory – Introduction to the theory and practice of methods used in the organic chemistry laboratory. An emphasis is placed on the separation and purification of organic compounds. Techniques covered will include extraction, distillation, sublimation, recrystalization, and chromatography. Detailed discussions and applications of infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be included.
Civil and Environmental Engineering 100, 001 – Spring 2012
MARK T STACEY
Elementary Fluid Mechanics – Fluid statics and dynamics, including laboratory experiments with technical reports. Fundamentals: integral and differential formulations of the conservation laws are solved in special cases such as boundary layers and pipe flow. Flow visualization and computation techniques are introduced using Matlab. Empirical equations are used for turbulent flows, drag, pumps, and open channels. Principles of empirical equations are also discussed: dimensional analysis, regression, and uncertainty.
Civil and Environmental Engineering 120, 001 – Spring 2012
MARIOS AGATHOKLIS PANAGIOTOU
Structural Engineering – Introduction to design and analysis of structural systems. Loads and load placement. Proportioning of structural members in steel, reinforced concrete, and timber. Structural analysis theory. Hand and computer analysis methods, validation of results from computer analysis. Applications, including bridges, building frames, and long-span cable structures.

Cognitive Science C103, 001 – Spring 2012
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Computer Science 10, 001 – Spring 2012
DANIEL GARCIA
The Beauty and Joy of Computing – An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing. The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the world. How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.

Computer Science 162, 001 – Spring 2012
ANTHONY D. JOSEPH, ION STOICA
Operating Systems and System Programming – Basic concepts of operating systems and system programming. Utility programs, subsystems, multiple-program systems. Processes, interprocess communication, and synchronization. Memory allocation, segmentation, paging. Loading and linking, libraries. Resource allocation, scheduling, performance evaluation. File systems, storage devices, I/O systems. Protection, security, and privacy.

Computer Science 164, 001 – Spring 2012
RASTISLAV BODIK
Programming Languages and Compilers – Survey of programming languages. The design of modern programming languages. Principles and techniques of scanning, parsing, semantic analysis, and code generation. Implementation of compilers, interpreters, and assemblers. Overview of run-time organization and error handling.

Computer Science 169, 001 – Spring 2012
DAVID PATTERSON, ARMANDO FOX, KOUSHIK SEN
Software Engineering – Ideas and techniques for designing, developing, and modifying large software systems. Function-oriented and object-oriented modular design techniques, designing for re-use and maintainability. Specification and documentation. Verification and validation. Cost and quality metrics and estimation. Project team organization and management. Students will work in teams on a substantial programming project.

Computer Science 170, 001 – Spring 2012
CHRISTOS H PAPADIMITRIOU, SATISH B RAO
Efficient Algorithms and Intractable Problems – Concept and basic techniques in the design and analysis of algorithms; models of computation; lower bounds; algorithms for optimum search trees, balanced trees and UNION-FIND algorithms; numerical and algebraic algorithms; combinatorial algorithms. Turing machines, how to count steps, deterministic and nondeterministic Turing machines, NP-completeness. Unsolvable and intractable problems.

Computer Science 188, 001 – Spring 2012
PIETER ABBEEL
Basic ideas and techniques underlying the design of intelligent computer systems. Topics include heuristic search, problem solving, game playing, knowledge representation, logical inference, planning, reasoning under uncertainty, expert systems, learning, perception, language understanding.

Computer Science 61A, 001 – Spring 2012
PAUL HILFINGER
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs – Introduction to programming and computer science. This course exposes students to techniques of abstraction at several levels: (a) within a programming language, using higher-order functions, manifest types, data-directed programming, and message-passing; (b) between programming languages, using functional and rule-based languages as examples. It also relates these techniques to the practical problems of implementation of languages and algorithms on a von Neumann machine. There are several significant programming projects, programmed in a dialect of the LISP language.

Computer Science C149, 001 – Spring 2012
EDWARD A. LEE
Introduction to Embedded Systems – This course introduces students to the basics of models, analysis tools, and control for embedded systems operating in real time. Students learn how to combine physical processes with computation. Topics include models of computation, control, analysis and verification, interfacing with the physical world, mapping to platforms, and distributed embedded systems. The course has a strong laboratory component, with emphasis on a semester-long sequence of projects.

Economics 1, 001 – Spring 2012
J. BRADFORD DELONG
Introduction to Economics – A survey of economics designed to give an overview of the field.
Economics 100B, 001 – Spring 2012
STEVEN A. WOOD
Economic Analysis–Macro – A study of the factors which determine national income, employment, and price levels, with attention to the effects of monetary and fiscal policy.
Economics 104, 001 – Spring 2012
CRISTIAN J SANTESTEBAN
Advanced Microeconomic Theory – This course explores some issues in advanced microeconomic theory, with special emphasis on game-theoretic models and the theory of choice under uncertainty. Specific applications will vary from year to year, but will generally include topics from information economics and models of strategic interaction.

Economics 121, 001 – Spring 2012
GLENN A WOROCH
Industrial Organization and Public Policy – The organization and structure of production in the U.S. economy. Determinants of market structure, business behavior, and economic performance. Implications for antitrust policy.
Economics C3, 001 – Spring 2012
GORDON RAUSSER
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Electrical Engineering 140, 001 – Spring 2012
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
Linear Integrated Circuits – Single and multiple stage transistor amplifiers. Operational amplifiers. Feedback amplifiers, 2-port formulation, source, load, and feedback network loading. Frequency response of cascaded amplifiers, gain-bandwidth exchange, compensation, dominant pole techniques, root locus. Supply and temperature independent biasing and references. Selected applications of analog circuits such as analog-to-digital converters, switched capacitor filters, and comparators. The laboratory builds on the concepts presented in the lectures and provides hands-on design experience and help with the use of computer aided design tools such as SPICE.

Electrical Engineering 227A, 001 – Spring 2012
LAURENT EL GHAOUI
Introduction to Convex Optimization – Convex optimization is a class of nonlinear optimization problems where the objective to be minimized, and the constraints, are both convex. Contrarily to the more classical linear programming framework, convex programs often go unrecognized, and this is a pity since a large class of convex optimization problems can now be efficiently solved. In addition, it is possible to address hard, non convex problems (such as “combinatorial optimization” problems) using convex approximations that are more efficient than classical linear ones. The course covers some convex optimization theory and algorithms, and describes various applications arising in engineering design, machine learning and statistics, finance, and operations research. The course includes labatory assignments, which consist of hands-on experiments with the optimization software CVX, and a discussion section.
Electrical Engineering C149, 001 – Spring 2012
EDWARD A. LEE
Introduction to Embedded Systems – This course introduces students to the basics of models, analysis tools, and control for embedded systems operating in real time. Students learn how to combine physical processes with computation. Topics include models of computation, control, analysis and verification, interfacing with the physical world, mapping to platforms, and distributed embedded systems. The course has a strong laboratory component, with emphasis on a semester-long sequence of projects.

English 180E, 001 – Spring 2012
MAURA BRIDGET NOLAN AND CHARLES F. ALTIERI
The Epic – Reading and discussion of epics, considering their cultural and historical contexts, the nature of their composition, and the development of the form.
Environ Sci, Policy, and Management 114, 001 – Spring 2012
WILLIAM BEAN
Wildlife Ecology – Introduction to wildlife ecology and its relationship to management programs. Includes population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization, followed by selected case studies.

Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C11, 001 – Spring 2012
LYNN HUNTSINGER
Americans and the Global Forest – This course challenges students to think about how individual and American consumer decisions affect forest ecosystems around the world. A survey course that highlights the consequences of different ways of thinking about the forest as a global ecosystem and as a source of goods like trees, water, wildlife, food, jobs, and services. The scientific tools and concepts that have guided management of the forest for the last 100 years, and the laws, rules, and informal institutions that have shaped use of the forests, are analyzed.
Environmental Economics and Policy C1, 001 – Spring 2012
GORDON RAUSSER
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

History 162A, 001 – Spring 2012
DAVID WETZEL
Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914 – This upper division course looks at the rise and fall of the European great powers from the Peace of Westphalia, traditionally perceived as the beginning of the modern states system, to the coming of the First World War, an era of state and empire building. Economic and technological trends are naturally part of the story as well as cultural, social, and political forces. At the same time, the course highlights the decisive influence of the shakers and movers–kings, emperors, and generals.
History 186, 001 – Spring 2012
DANIEL SARGENT
International and Global History since 1945 – This course explores great and complex global historical changes that have taken place since the end of the second World War. By situating the major postwar upheavals – from decolonization to the Cold War; from population growth to environmental degradation; from globalization to the endurance of economic inequalities – in comparative and international contexts, this course encourages students to see the origins of our own times and dilemmas in their proper historical context and provides an introduction to recent international and gloal history.
History C192, 001 – Spring 2012
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Information C103, 001 – Spring 2012
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Integrative Biology 31, 001 – Spring 2012
ROY L. CALDWELL
The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior – Principles of evolution biology as they relate to animal behavior and behavioral ecology with broad coverage of animal groups. Special attention will be paid to the emerging discipline of behavioral ecology.
Japanese 155, 001 – Spring 2012
JOHN R. WALLACE
Modern Japanese Literature – This course is an introduction to Japanese modernism through the reading and discussion of representative short stories, poetry, and criticism of the Taisho and early Showa periods. We will examine the aesthetic bases of modernist writing and confront the challenge posed by their use of poetic language. The question of literary form and the relationship between poetry and prose in the works will receive special attention.
Japanese 7B, 001 – Spring 2012
JOHN R. WALLACE
Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture – An introduction to Japanese literature in translation in a two-semester sequence. 7B provides a survey of important works of 19th- and 20th-century Japanese fiction, poetry, and cultural criticism. The course will explore the manner in which writers responded to the challenges of industrialization, internationalization, and war. Topics include the shifting notions of tradition and modernity, the impact of Westernization on the constructions of the self and gender, writers and the wartime state, literature of the atomic bomb, and postmodern fantasies and aesthetics. All readings are in English translation. Techniques of critical reading and writing will be introduced as an integral part of the course.
Journalism 102AC, 001 – Spring 2012
WILLIAM J. DRUMMOND
The Wire: When Journalism Meets Drama – The goal of the class is to make students aware of how the issues of crime, policing, and identity are framed and mediated through television, as well as through conventional journalism. The class will explore the relationship between real crime, popular fiction, and television, specifically The Wire.

Legal Studies 145, 001 – Spring 2012
JUSTIN MCCRARY, ERIC L. TALLEY
Law and Economics I – The course will apply microeconomic theory analysis to legal rules and procedures. Emphasis will be given to the economic consequences of various sorts of liability rules, remedies for breach of contract and the allocation of property rights. The jurisprudential significance of the analysis will be discussed.

Legal Studies 160, 001 – Spring 2012
JONATHAN S. SIMON
Punishment, Culture, and Society – This course surveys the development of Western penal practices, institutions, and ideas (what David Garland calls “penality”) from the eighteenth-century period to the present. Our primary focus will be on penal practices and discourses in the United States in the early 21st century. In particular we will examine the extraordinary growth of US penal sanctions in the last quarter century and the sources and consequences of what some have called “mass imprisonment.”

Letters and Science C30U, 001 – Spring 2012
LYNN HUNTSINGER
Americans and the Global Forest – This course challenges students to think about how individual and American consumer decisions affect forest ecosystems around the world. A survey course that highlights the consequences of different ways of thinking about the forest as a global ecosystem and as a source of goods like trees, water, wildlife, food, jobs, and services. The scientific tools and concepts that have guided management of the forest for the last 100 years, and the laws, rules, and informal institutions that have shaped use of the forests, are analyzed.
Letters and Science C70V, 001 – Spring 2012
YURY G KOLOMENSKY
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Mathematics 16A, 001 – Spring 2012
SANTIAGO CANEZ
Analytic Geometry and Calculus – This sequence is intended for majors in the life and social sciences. Calculus of one variable; derivatives, definite integrals and applications, maxima and minima, and applications of the exponential and logarithmic functions.
Mathematics 16B, 001 – Spring 2012
BENJAMIN E. JOHNSON
Analytic Geometry and Calculus – Continuation of 16A. Application of integration of economics and life sciences. Differential equations. Functions of many variables. Partial derivatives, constrained and unconstrained optimization.
Mathematics 16B, 002 – Spring 2012
BENJAMIN E. JOHNSON
Analytic Geometry and Calculus – Continuation of 16A. Application of integration of economics and life sciences. Differential equations. Functions of many variables. Partial derivatives, constrained and unconstrained optimization.
Mathematics 1B, 001 – Spring 2012
SLOBODAN SIMIC
Calculus – Continuation of 1A. Techniques of integration; applications of integration. Infinite sequences and series. First-order ordinary differential equations. Second-order ordinary differential equations; oscillation and damping; series solutions of ordinary differential equations.
Mathematics 1B, 003 – Spring 2012
F. MICHAEL CHRIST
Calculus – Continuation of 1A. Techniques of integration; applications of integration. Infinite sequences and series. First-order ordinary differential equations. Second-order ordinary differential equations; oscillation and damping; series solutions of ordinary differential equations.
Media Studies 104A, 001 – Spring 2012
WILLIAM B TURNER
Freedom of Speech and the Press – The course considers the history and contemporary meaning of the First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and the press. Emphasizing the real world implications of major Supreme Court decisions, the course examines restrictions on speech and press imposed by national security, libel, injurious speech, and privacy, as well as issues of access to information and government regulation of new media.

Media Studies C104C, 001 – Spring 2012
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information – This course explores the history of information and associated technologies, uncovering why we think of ours as “the information age.” We will select moments in the evolution of production, recording, and storage from the earliest writing systems to the world of Short Message Service (SMS) and blogs. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with both what and when and how and why, and we will keep returning to the question of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Molecular and Cell Biology 110, 001 – Spring 2012
RICHARD CALENDAR, KATHLEEN COLLINS, EVA NOGALES
Molecular Biology: Macromolecular Synthesis and Cellular Function – Molecular biology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their viruses. Mechanisms of DNA replication, transcription, translation. Structure of genes and chromosomes. Regulation of gene expression. Biochemical processes and principles in membrane structure and function, intracellular trafficking and subcellular compartmentation, cytoskeletal architecture, nucleocytoplasmic transport, signal transduction mechanisms, and cell cycle control.
Philosophy 132, 001 – Spring 2012
JOHN R. SEARLE
Philosophy of Mind – Mind and matter; other minds; the concept “person.”
Physics 112, 001 – Spring 2012
BERNARD SADOULET
Introduction to Statistical and Thermal Physics – Basic concepts of statistical mechanics, microscopic basis of thermodynamics and applications to macroscopic systems, condensed states, phase transformations, quantum distributions, elementary kinetic theory of transport processes, fluctuation phenomena.

Physics 7C, 001 – Spring 2012
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Electromagnetic waves, optics, relativity, and quantum physics.
Physics 8B, 002 – Spring 2012
MICHAEL DEWEESE
Introductory Physics – Introduction to electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, and modern physics. The course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics C10, 001 – Spring 2012
YURY G KOLOMENSKY
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Plant and Microbial Biology 160, 001 – Spring 2012
ROBERT L. FISCHER, JENNIFER C. FLETCHER
Plant Molecular Genetics – A consideration of plant genetics and molecular biology. Principles of nuclear and organellar genome structure and function: regulation of gene expression in response to environmental and developmental stimuli; clonal analysis; investigation of the molecular and genetic bases for the exceptional cellular and developmental strategies adopted by plants.

Political Science 179, 001 – Spring 2012
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science – Political issues facing the state of California, the United States, or the international community.
Psychology 130, 001 – Spring 2012
ANN M. KRING
Clinical Psychology – Theoretical and empirical approaches to the explanation of psychological dysfunction. The relation between theories of psychopathology and theories of intervention. A critical evaluation of the effects of individual, family, and community approaches to therapeutic and preventive intervention. Thematic focus of the course may change from year to year. See department notices for details.
Psychology 131, 001 – Spring 2012
STEPHEN HINSHAW
Developmental Psychopathology – This course will discuss linkages between developmental processes and child psychopathology. Included will be discussion of cognitive impairments in children, including learning disabilities and mental retardation; internalizing disorders, such as anxiety, withdrawal, and depression; externalizing disorders, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder; and child abuse and neglect. Psychobiological, familial, legal, and societal factors will be emphasized.
Public Health 145, 001 – Spring 2012
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Statistical Analysis of Continuous Outcome Data – Regression models for continuous outcome data: least squares estimates and their properties, interpreting coefficients, prediction, comparing models, checking model assumptions, transformations, outliers, and influential points. Categorical explanatory variables: interaction and analysis of covariance, correlation and partial correlation. Appropriate graphical methods and statistical computing. Analysis of variance for one- and two-factor models: F tests, assumption checking, multiple comparisons. Random effects models and variance components. Introduction to repeated measures models.
Public Health 241, 001 – Spring 2012
NICHOLAS P. JEWELL
Statistical Analysis of Categorical Data – Biostatistical concepts and modeling relevant to the design and analysis of multifactor population-based cohort and case-control studies, including matching. Measures of association, causal inference, confounding interaction. Introduction to binary regression, including logistic regression.

Statistics 2, 001 – Spring 2012
SHOBHANA STOYANOV
Introduction to Statistics – Population and variables. Standard measures of location, spread and association. Normal approximation. Regression. Probability and sampling. Binomial distribution. Interval estimation. Some standard significance tests.
Statistics 21, 001 – Spring 2012
FLETCHER H IBSER
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business – Descriptive statistics, probability models and related concepts, sample surveys, estimates, confidence intervals, tests of significance, controlled experiments vs. observational studies, correlation and regression.
Fall 2011
Astronomy 10, 002 – Fall 2011
MARC DAVIS
A description of modern astronomy with emphasis on the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the Universe.

Biology 1A, 001 – Fall 2011
JENNIFER A. DOUDNA, JOHN G. FORTE, MICHAEL MEIGHAN, ROBERT L. FISCHER
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function.

Biology 1AL, 001 – Fall 2011
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1B, 001 – Fall 2011
ALAN SHABEL, MIKE MOSER, BRUCE G. BALDWIN, JOHN P. HULSENBECK
General introduction to plant development, form, and function; population genetics, ecology, and evolution. Intended for students majoring in the biological sciences, but open to all qualified students.

Chemistry 1A, 001 – Fall 2011
ANGELICA STACY, MICHELLE DOUSKEY
Stoichiometry of chemical reactions, quantum mechanical description of atoms, the elements and periodic table, chemical bonding, real and ideal gases, thermochemistry, introduction to thermodynamics and equilibrium, acid-base and solubility equilibria, introduction to oxidation-reduction reactions, introduction to chemical kinetics.

Chemistry 3B, 002 – Fall 2011
K. PETER VOLLHARDT
Chemical Structure and Reactivity – Conjugation, aromatic chemistry, carbonyl compounds, carbohydrates, amines, carboxylic acids, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acid chemistry. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and mass spectrometry will be introduced.

Cognitive Science C127, 001 – Fall 2011
RICHARD IVRY
This course will examine research investigating the neurological basis of cognition. Material covered will include the study of brain-injured patients, neurophysiological research in animals, and the study of normal cognitive processes in humans with non-invasive behavioral and physiological techniques such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).
Computer Science 10, 001 – Fall 2011
DANIEL GARCIA
An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing. The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the world. How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.

Computer Science 162, 001 – Fall 2011
ANTHONY D. JOSEPH, ION STOICA
Basic concepts of operating systems and system programming. Utility programs, subsystems, multiple-program systems. Processes, interprocess communication, and synchronization. Memory allocation, segmentation, paging. Loading and linking, libraries. Resource allocation, scheduling, performance evaluation. File systems, storage devices, I/O systems. Protection, security, and privacy.

Computer Science 188, 001 – Fall 2011
DAN KLEIN
Basic ideas and techniques underlying the design of intelligent computer systems. Topics include heuristic search, problem solving, game playing, knowledge representation, logical inference, planning, reasoning under uncertainty, expert systems, learning, perception, language understanding.

Computer Science 61B, 001 – Fall 2011
PAUL HILFINGER
Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays strings, and hash tables. Storage management. Elementary principles of software engineering. Abstract data types. Algorithms for sorting and searching. Introduction to the Java programming language.

Computer Science 61C, 001 – Fall 2011
DANIEL GARCIA, MICHAEL FRANKLIN
Machine Structures – The internal organization and operation of digital computers. Machine architecture, support for high-level languages (logic, arithmetic, instruction sequencing) and operating systems (I/O, interrupts, memory management, process switching). Elements of computer logic design. Tradeoffs involved in fundamental architectural design decisions.

Earth and Planetary Science C20, 001 – Fall 2011
RICHARD ALLEN
Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

Economics 1, 001 – Fall 2011
KENNETH E. TRAIN
A survey of economics designed to give an overview of the field.

Economics 100B, 001 – Fall 2011
STEVEN A. WOOD
Economic Analysis–Macro – A study of the factors which determine national income, employment, and price levels, with attention to the effects of monetary and fiscal policy.
Economics 119, 001 – Fall 2011
DANIEL J. ACLAND
Psychology and Economics – This course presents psychological and experimental economics research demonstrating departures from perfect rationality, self-interest, and other classical assumptions of economics and explores ways that these departures can be mathematically modeled and incorporated into mainstream positive and normative economics. The course will focus on the behavioral evidence itself, especially on specific formal assumptions that capture the findings in a way that can be incorporated into economics. The implications of these new assumptions for theoretical and empirical economics will be explored.

Economics C3, 001 – Fall 2011
PETER BERCK
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Economics 119, 001 – Fall 2011
Psychology and Economics Daniel J. Acland

Electrical Engineering 100, 001 – Fall 2011
VIVEK SUBRAMANIAN
Electronic Techniques for Engineering – This course serves as an introduction to the principles of electrical engineering, starting from the basic concepts of voltage and current and circuit elements of resistors, capacitors, and inductors.

Electrical Engineering 105, 001 – Fall 2011
SAYEEF SALAHUDDIN
Microelectronic Devices and Circuits

Electrical Engineering 141, 001 – Fall 2011
BORIVOJE NIKOLIC
Introduction to Digital Integrated Circuits

Electrical Engineering 42, 001 – Fall 2011
VIVEK SUBRAMANIAN
Electronic Techniques for Engineering – This course serves as an introduction to the principles of electrical engineering, starting from the basic concepts of voltage and current and circuit elements of resistors, capacitors, and inductors.

Electrical Engineering C245, 001 – Fall 2011
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
Physics, fabrication, and design of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). Micro and nanofabrication processes, including silicon surface and bulk micromachining and non-silicon micromachining. Integration strategies and assembly processes. Microsensor and microactuator devices: electrostatic, piezoresistive, piezoelectric, thermal, magnetic transduction. Electronic position-sensing circuits and electrical and mechanical noise. CAD for MEMS.

Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C103, 001 – Fall 2011
CLAIRE KREMEN
A survey of the principles and practices of conservation biology. Factors that affect the creation, destruction, and distribution of biological diversity at the level of the gene, species, and ecosystem are examined. Tools and management options derived from ecology and evolutionary biology that can recover or prevent the loss of biological diversity are explored.
Environmental Economics and Policy 100, 001 – Fall 2011
ETHAN A. LIGON
Microeconomic Theory with Application to Natural Resources – Covers the basic microeconomic tools for further study of natural resource problems. Theory of consumption, production, theory of the firm, industrial organization, general equilibrium, public goods and externalities. Applications to agriculture and natural resources.

Environmental Economics and Policy C1, 001 – Fall 2011
PETER BERCK
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Geography 130, 001 – Fall 2011
NATHAN F. SAYRE
Food and the Environment – How do human populations organize and alter natural resources and ecosystems to produce food? The role of agriculture in the world economy, national development, and environmental degradation in the Global North and the Global South. The origins of scarcity and abundance, population growth and migration, hunger, and poverty.
Geography C110, 001 – Fall 2011
RICHARD A. WALKER
Economic Geography of the Industrial World – Industrialization, urbanization, and economic growth in the global North. Locational patterns in manufacturing, retailing trade, and finance. Geographic dynamics of technical change, employment, business organization, resource use, and divisions of labor. Property, labor, and social conflict as geographic forces. Local, national, and continental rivalries in a global economy, and challenges to U.S. dominance.

History 151C, 001 – Fall 2011
JAMES VERNON
The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-2000 – For many years, Britain was seen as the crucible of the modern world. This small, cold, and wet island was thought to have been the first to develop representative democracy, an industrial economy, rapid transport, mass cities, mass communication and mass culture, and, of course, an empire upon which the sun famously never set. And yet, despite this precocious modernity, imperial Britain remained a deeply traditional society unable to rid itself of ancient institutions like the monarchy, the aristocracy, and the established church. The focus of the course is on how this combination of the old and the new produced a broadly liberal set of mentalities through which Britons came to understand and manage the great transformations of modern life, both at home and across the empire.

History 167A, 001 – Fall 2011
DAVID WETZEL
Early Modern Germany – From the period of the Protestant Reformation to the era of enlightened despotism and the French Revolution, German history was characterized by severe conflicts and problems unresolved. Early Modern German history contains many lessons concerning the relationship of war and peace, of violence and toleration, of reform and renewal and the rejection of any change, of Baroque splendor and widespread misery, of some progress and much disappointment, in short: of a most complicated legacy for future generations.
History C187, 001 – Fall 2011
THOMAS W. LAQUEUR
The History and Practice of Human Rights – A required class for students in the human rights minor (but open to others), this course examines the development of human rights. More than a history of origins, it explores the relationships between human rights and other crucial themes in the history of the modern era. As a history of international trends and an examination of specific practices, it will ask students to make comparisons across space and time and to reflect upon the evolution of human rights in both thought and action.

Integrative Biology C156, 001 – Fall 2011
CLAIRE KREMEN
A survey of the principles and practices of conservation biology. Factors that affect the creation, destruction, and distribution of biological diversity at the level of the gene, species, and ecosystem are examined. Tools and management options derived from ecology and evolutionary biology that can recover or prevent the loss of biological diversity are explored.
Interdisciplinary Studies Field Maj C101, 001 – Fall 2011
RICHARD A. WALKER
Economic Geography of the Industrial World – Industrialization, urbanization, and economic growth in the global North. Locational patterns in manufacturing, retailing trade, and finance. Geographic dynamics of technical change, employment, business organization, resource use, and divisions of labor. Property, labor, and social conflict as geographic forces. Local, national, and continental rivalries in a global economy, and challenges to U.S. dominance.

International and Area Studies 106, 001 – Fall 2011
MAXIMILIAN AUFFHAMMER
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory – This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of intermediate microeconomic theory. It covers a number of topics including consumer and demand theory, firm, production and cost theory, competitive market theory, imperfect competition, welfare economics, choice under uncertainty and information. All analysis conducted in the course relies on graphical and algebraic techniques.
International and Area Studies 206, 001 – Fall 2011
MAXIMILIAN AUFFHAMMER
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory – This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of intermediate microeconomic theory. It covers a number of topics including consumer and demand theory, firm, production and cost theory, competitive market theory, imperfect competition, welfare economics, choice under uncertainty and information. All analysis conducted in the course relies on graphical and algebraic techniques.
Japanese 7A, 001 – Fall 2011
JOHN R. WALLACE
Introduction to Pre-Modern Japanese Literature and Culture – This course provides an overview of Japanese literature and cultural history, from the seventh to the 18th century.
Legal Studies 163, 001 – Fall 2011
FRANKLIN ZIMRIN
Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Justice
Letters and Science C140V, 001 – Fall 2011
THOMAS W. LAQUEUR
The History and Practice of Human Rights – A required class for students in the human rights minor (but open to others), this course examines the development of human rights. More than a history of origins, it explores the relationships between human rights and other crucial themes in the history of the modern era. As a history of international trends and an examination of specific practices, it will ask students to make comparisons across space and time and to reflect upon the evolution of human rights in both thought and action.

Letters and Science C70V, 001 – Fall 2011
STEVEN EDWARD BOGGS
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Letters and Science C70Y, 001 – Fall 2011
RICHARD ALLEN
Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

Mathematics 16A, 001 – Fall 2011
BENJAMIN E. JOHNSON
Analytic Geometry and Calculus – This sequence is intended for majors in the life and social sciences. Calculus of one variable; derivatives, definite integrals and applications, maxima and minima, and applications of the exponential and logarithmic functions.

Mathematics 16A, 002 – Fall 2011
BENJAMIN E. JOHNSON
Analytic Geometry and Calculus – This sequence is intended for majors in the life and social sciences. Calculus of one variable; derivatives, definite integrals and applications, maxima and minima, and applications of the exponential and logarithmic functions.

Mathematics 16B, 001 – Fall 2011
THOMAS SCANLON
Analytic Geometry and Calculus – Continuation of 16A. Application of integration of economics and life sciences. Differential equations. Functions of many variables. Partial derivatives, constrained and unconstrained optimization.

Mechanical Engineering C218, 001 – Fall 2011
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
Physics, fabrication, and design of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). Micro and nanofabrication processes, including silicon surface and bulk micromachining and non-silicon micromachining. Integration strategies and assembly processes. Microsensor and microactuator devices: electrostatic, piezoresistive, piezoelectric, thermal, magnetic transduction. Electronic position-sensing circuits and electrical and mechanical noise. CAD for MEMS.

Molecular and Cell Biology 110, 001 – Fall 2011
QIANG ZHOU, KATHLEEN COLLINS, QING ZHONG
Molecular Biology: Macromolecular Synthesis and Cellular Function – Molecular biology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their viruses. Mechanisms of DNA replication, transcription, translation. Structure of genes and chromosomes. Regulation of gene expression. Biochemical processes and principles in membrane structure and function, intracellular trafficking and subcellular compartmentation, cytoskeletal architecture, nucleocytoplasmic transport, signal transduction mechanisms, and cell cycle control.
Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology 103, 001 – Fall 2011
DANICA CHEN, SHARON FLEMING
Nutrient Function and Metabolism – Delivery of nutrients from foods to mammalian cells; major metabolic pathways; function of nutrients in energy metabolism, nitrogen and lipid metabolism, structural tissues and regulation; essentiality, activation, storage, excretion, and toxicity of nutrients.
Philosophy 133, 001 – Fall 2011
JOHN R. SEARLE
Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 138, 001 – Fall 2011
JOHN R. SEARLE
Philosophy of Society – This course deals with the ontology of society and thus provides a foundation for the social sciences. The main questions discussed are: 1) What is the mode of existence of social reality? 2) How does it relate to psychological and physical reality? 3) What implications does social ontology have for social explanations?
Philosophy 3, 001 – Fall 2011
JOHN JOSEPH CAMPBELL
The Nature of Mind – Introduction to the philosophy of mind. Topics to be considered may include the relation between mind and body; the structure of action; the nature of desires and beliefs; the role of the unconscious.

Physics 7A, 001 – Fall 2011
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Mechanics and wave motion
Physics 7A, 002 – Fall 2011
ACHILLES SPELIOTOPOULOS
Physics for Scientists and Engineers – Mechanics and wave motion
Physics 8B, 001 – Fall 2011
JOEL FAJANS
Introductory Physics – Introduction to electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, and modern physics. The course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics 8B, 002 – Fall 2011
JOEL FAJANS
Introductory Physics – Introduction to electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, and modern physics. The course presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper division study in biology and architecture.
Physics C10, 001 – Fall 2011
STEVEN EDWARD BOGGS
Descriptive Introduction to Physics – The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Political Science 179, 001 – Fall 2011
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science
Practice Of Art 23AC, 001 – Fall 2011
GREG NIEMEYER, JAMES HILSTON
This new course will enable students to think critically about, and engage in practical experiments in, the complex interactions between new media and perceptions and performances of embodiment, agency, citizenship, collective action, individual identity, time and spatiality. We will pay particular attention to the categories of personhood that make up the UC Berkeley American Cultures rubric (race and ethnicity), as well as to gender, nation, and disability. The argument threading through the course will be the ways in which new media both reinforce pre-existing social hierarchies, and yet offer possibilities for the transcendence of those very categories. The new media — and we will leave the precise definition of the new media as something to be argued about over the course of the semester — can be yet another means for dividing and disenfranchising, and can be the conduit of violence and transnational dominance.

Psychology 1, 001 – Fall 2011
CHRISTOPHER GADE
General Psychology – Introduction to the principal areas, problems, and concepts of psychology. This course is required for the major; students not considering a psychology major are directed to 2.
Psychology 101, 001 – Fall 2011
FREDERIC THEUNISSEN
Research and Data Analysis in Psychology – The course will concentrate on hypothesis formulation and testing, tests of significance, analysis of variance (one-way analysis), simple correlation, simple regression, and nonparametric statistics such as chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests.

Psychology C127, 001 – Fall 2011
RICHARD IVRY
This course will examine research investigating the neurological basis of cognition. Material covered will include the study of brain-injured patients, neurophysiological research in animals, and the study of normal cognitive processes in humans with non-invasive behavioral and physiological techniques such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).
Public Health 200C2, 001 – Fall 2011
KIRK R. SMITH
Environmental Health Sciences – This course will give an introduction to the major human and natural activities that lead to release of hazardous materials into the environment as well as the causal links between chemical, physical, and biological hazards in the environment and their impact on human health, including those related to climate change. The basic principles of toxicology, exposure assessment, risk assessment, risk perception, and environmental health policy will be presented. The overall role of environmental risks in the pattern of human disease, both nationally and internationally, will be covered.

Public Health 245, 001 – Fall 2011
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Introduction to Multivariate Statistics – The following topics are discussed in the context of biomedical and biological application: multiple regression, loglinear models, discriminant analysis, principal components. Instruction in statistical computing is given in the laboratory session.
Public Health 250A, 001 – Fall 2011
ARTHUR L. REINGOLD
Epidemiologic Methods I – Principles and methods of epidemiology: study design, selection, and definition of cases and controls; sampling, data collection, analysis, and inference. Discussion session provides an opportunity to apply methods to problem sets and to discuss issues presented in lectures.

Public Health 250B, 001 – Fall 2011
JENNIFER AHERN
Epidemiologic Methods II – This course is intended as an intermediate level course in the field of epidemiology. Topics include causal inference; measurement of disease rates; inferential reasoning; and research study designs including ecologic, case-control, cohort, intervention trials, and meta-analytic designs (potential sources of bias, confounding, and effect modification in each research design are explored in depth); topics in clinical epidemiology including the use of likelihood ratios, receiver operator curves, and the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value of a test; and a brief introduction to logistic regression, survival analysis, and decision analysis. The readings from this course are drawn primarily from advanced epidemiology textbooks (Kleinbuam, Rothman, Miettinen).

Statistics 20, 002 – Fall 2011
DEBORAH NOLAN
Relative frequencies, discrete probability, random variables, expectation. Testing hypotheses. Estimation. Illustrations from various fields.

Statistics 21, 001 – Fall 2011
SHOBHANA STOYANOV
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business – Descriptive statistics, probability models and related concepts, sample surveys, estimates, confidence intervals, tests of significance, controlled experiments vs. observational studies, correlation and regression.
Spring 2011
Anthropology 1, 001 – Spring 2011
TERRENCE W. DEACON
Introduction to Biological Anthropology – An introduction to human evolution. Physical and behavioral adaptations of humans and their prehistoric and living relatives. Issues in evolutionary theory, molecular evolution, primate behavior, interpretation of fossils. Prehistoric activities, racial differences, genetic components of behavior are defined and evaluated.
Astronomy 7B, 001 – Spring 2011
JOSHUA SIMON BLOOM
Introduction to Astrophysics

Bioengineering 200, 001 – Spring 2011
VARIOUS SPEAKERS
The Graduate Group Introductory Seminar

Biology 1A, 001 – Spring 2011
GARY L. FIRSTONE, JASPER D. RINE, JENNIFER A DOUDNA
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function.

Biology 1AL, 001 – Spring 2011
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1B, 001 – Spring 2011
MIKE MOSER, LEWIS J FELDMAN, CRAIG MORITZ, VINCENT H. RESH
General introduction to plant development, form, and function; population genetics, ecology, and evolution. Intended for students majoring in the biological sciences, but open to all qualified students.

Chemistry 1A, 001 – Spring 2011
HEINO NITSCHE, CHUNMEI LI
Stoichiometry of chemical reactions, quantum mechanical description of atoms, the elements and periodic table, chemical bonding, real and ideal gases, thermochemistry, introduction to thermodynamics and equilibrium, acid-base and solubility equilibria, introduction to oxidation-reduction reactions, introduction to chemical kinetics.

Chemistry C234, 001 – Spring 2011
JOHN ARNOLD
Green Chemistry: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Sustainability

Cognitive Science C102, 001 – Spring 2011
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
Scientific Approaches to Consciousness

Cognitive Science C103, 001 – Spring 2011
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information

Computer Science 10, 001 – Spring 2011
DANIEL GARCIA
An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing. The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the world. How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.

Computer Science 164, 001 – Spring 2011
PAUL HILFINGER
Programming Languages and Compilers – Survey of programming languages. The design of modern programming languages. Principles and techniques of scanning, parsing, semantic analysis, and code generation. Implementation of compilers, interpreters, and assemblers. Overview of run-time organization and error handling.

Computer Science 61A, 001 – Spring 2011
BRIAN HARVEY
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

Computer Science 70, 001 – Spring 2011
JAMES W. DEMMEL
Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory
Computer Science C149, 001 – Spring 2011
SANJIT SESHIA, EDWARD A. LEE
Introduction to Embedded Systems – This course introduces students to the basics of models, analysis tools, and control for embedded systems operating in real time. Students learn how to combine physical processes with computation. Topics include models of computation, control, analysis and verification, interfacing with the physical world, mapping to platforms, and distributed embedded systems. The course has a strong laboratory component, with emphasis on a semester-long sequence of projects.

East Asian Languages and Cultures 105, 001 – Spring 2011
JOHN R. WALLACE
Dynamics of Romantic Core Values in East Asian Premodern Literature
Economics 100B, 001 – Spring 2011
STEVEN A. WOOD
Economic Analysis–Macro – A study of the factors which determine national income, employment, and price levels, with attention to the effects of monetary and fiscal policy.
Economics 140, 001 – Spring 2011
GLENN A. WOROCH
Economic Statistics and Econonmetrics
Economics C3, 001 – Spring 2011
GORDON RAUSSER
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy issues.

Electrical Engineering 140, 001 – Spring 2011
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
Linear Integrated Circuits

Electrical Engineering 141, 001 – Spring 2011
JAN M. RABAEY
Introduction to Digital Integrated Circuits

Electrical Engineering 240, 001 – Spring 2011
SIMONE GABINI
Advanced Analog Integrated Circuits

Electrical Engineering 290C, 001 – Spring 2011
ELAD ALON
Advanced Topics in Circuit Design

Electrical Engineering C149, 001 – Spring 2011
SANJIT SESHIA, EDWARD A. LEE
Introduction to Embedded Systems – This course introduces students to the basics of models, analysis tools, and control for embedded systems operating in real time. Students learn how to combine physical processes with computation. Topics include models of computation, control, analysis and verification, interfacing with the physical world, mapping to platforms, and distributed embedded systems. The course has a strong laboratory component, with emphasis on a semester-long sequence of projects.

English 45B, 001 – Spring 2011
CHARLES F. ALTIERI
Literature in English
Environ Sci, Policy, and Management 114, 001 – Spring 2011
JUSTIN S. BRASHARES
Wildlife Ecology

Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C11, 001 – Spring 2011
LYNN HUNTSINGER
Americans and the Global Forest
Environmental Economics and Policy C1, 001 – Spring 2011
GORDON RAUSSER
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Geography 130, 001 – Spring 2011
NATHAN F. SAYRE
Food and the Environment – How do human populations organize and alter natural resources and ecosystems to produce food? The role of agriculture in the world economy, national development, and environmental degradation in the Global North and the Global South. The origins of scarcity and abundance, population growth and migration, hunger, and poverty.
History 162B, 001 – Spring 2011
DAVID WETZEL
War and Peace: International Relations since 1914 – This course analyzes the turbulent transitions from the classical European balance of power system to the global multipolar system of today. The course explores the political, economic, ideological, and technological roots of international affairs. Among topics discussed are the two world wars, inter-war collective security,the Cold War, European integration, imperialism and de-colonization, the collapse of Communism, the Middle East conflict, the rise of China and Japan, and the post-1990 international order.
History C192, 001 – Spring 2011
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information

Information C103, 001 – Spring 2011
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information

International and Area Studies 107, 001 – Spring 2011
J. BRADFORD DELONG
Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

International and Area Studies 207, 002 – Spring 2011
J. BRADFORD DELONG
Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

Japanese 159, 001 – Spring 2011
JOHN R. WALLACE
Contemporary Japanese Literature
Japanese 7B, 001 – Spring 2011
JOHN R. WALLACE
Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture
Legal Studies 140, 001 – Spring 2011
ROBERT B. BROWN
Property and Liberty
Letters and Science 70B, 001- Spring 2011
JOHN C. CHIANG, NATHAN F. SAYRE
Physical Science
Letters and Science C30U, 001 – Spring 2011
LYNN HUNTSINGER
Americans and the Global Forest
Mechanical Engineering 110, 001 – Spring 2011
ALICE M. AGOGINO, CLARK KELLOGG
Introduction to Product Development

Mechanical Engineering 132, 001 – Spring 2011
ROBERTO HOROWITZ
Dynamic Systems and Feedback
Media Studies C104C, 001 – Spring 2011
GEOFFREY D. NUNBERG, PAUL DUGUID
History of Information

Molecular and Cell Biology C148, 001 – Spring 2011
DANIEL BARSKY, N. LOUISE GLASS
Microbial Genomics and Genetics

Philosophy 132, 001 – Spring 2011
JOHN R. SEARLE
Philosophy of Mind
Physics 8A – Spring 2011
MARJORIE D. SHAPIRO
Introductory Physics
Plant and Microbial Biology 160, 001 – Spring 2011
ROBERT L. FISCHER, JENNIFER C. FLETCHER
Plant Molecular Genetics
Plant and Microbial Biology C148, 001 – Spring 2011
DANIEL BARSKY, N. LOUISE GLASS
Microbial Genomics and Genetics

Political Science 179, 001 – Spring 2011
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science

Practice Of Art 23AC, 001 – Spring 2011
GREG NIEMEYER
Foundations of American Cyber-Culture

Practice Of Art 8, 001 – Spring 2011
JOHN S. MCNAMARA
Introduction to Visual Thinking

Psychology C129, 001 – Spring 2011
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
Scientific Approaches to Consciousness

Public Health 145, 001 – Spring 2011
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Statistical Analysis of Continuous Outcome Data
Public Health 241, 001 – Spring 2011
NICHOLAS P. JEWELL
Statistical Analysis of Categorical Data

Public Health 253B, 001 – Spring 2011
TOMAS J. ARAGON
Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases

Public Health 253E, 001 – Spring 2011
HARVEY KAYMAN
Ethical Challenges in Public Health Interventions: Catastrophic and Routine

Public Health C234, 001 – Spring 2011
JOHN ARNOLD
Green Chemistry: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Sustainability

Public Health C242C, 001 – Spring 2011
ALAN HUBBARD
Longitudinal Data Analysis
Statistics C247C, 001 – Spring 2011
ALAN HUBBARD
Longitudinal Data Analysis
Undergrad. Business Administration 196, 006 – Spring 2011
ALICE M. AGOGINO, CLARK KELLOGG
Introduction to Product Development

Fall 2010
American Studies C132B, 001 – Fall 2010
CANDIDA SMITH
Intellectual History of the United States since 1865
Biology 1A, 001 – Fall 2010
RICHARD MALKIN, ROBERT L. FISCHER, JOHN G. FORTE
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function. Intended for biological sciences majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1AL, 001 – Fall 2010
MIKE MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1B, 001 – Fall 2010
JOHN P. HUELSENBECK, ALAN SHABEL, BRUCE G. BALDWIN
General Biology

Chemistry 1A, 001 – Fall 2010
ANGELICA STACY
General Chemistry

Chemistry 3B, 002 – Fall 2010
K. PETER VOLLHARDT
Chemical Structure and Reactivity

Computer Science 10, 001 – Fall 2010
BRIAN HARVEY, DANIEL GARCIA
The Beauty and Joy of Computing

Computer Science 162, 001 – Fall 2010
JOHN KUBIATOWICZ
Operating Systems and System Programming

Computer Science 169, 001 – Fall 2010
ARMANDO FOX
Software Engineering – Ideas and techniques for designing, developing, and modifying large software systems. Function-oriented and object-oriented modular design techniques, designing for re-use and maintainability. Specification and documentation. Verification and validation. Cost and quality metrics and estimation. Project team organization and management. Students will work in teams on a substantial programming project.

Computer Science 61A, 001 – Fall 2010
BRIAN HARVEY
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

Development Studies C10, 001 – Fall 2010
MICHAEL J WATTS
Introduction to Development

Economics 1, 001 – Fall 2010
J. BRADFORD DELONG
Introduction to Economics
Economics C181, 001 – Fall 2010
STEVEN A. WOOD
International Trade

Economics C3, 001 – Fall 2010
PETER BERCK
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Electrical Engineering 141, 001 – Fall 2010
ELAD ALON
Introduction to Digital Integrated Circuits

Electrical Engineering 40, 001 – Fall 2010
BERNHARD E. BOSER
Introduction to Microelectronic Circuits

Electrical Engineering C245, 001 – Fall 2010
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
Introduction to MEMS Design

English 117S, 001 – Fall 2010
CHARLES F. ALTIERI
Shakespeare
Environmental Economics and Policy C1, 001 – Fall 2010
PETER BERCK
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy – Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.

Environmental Economics and Policy C181, 001 – Fall 2010
STEVEN A. WOOD
International Trade

Geography C110, 001 – Fall 2010
RICHARD A. WALKER
Economic Geography of the Industrial World
Geography C32, 001 – Fall 2010
MICHAEL J WATTS
Introduction to Development

History 130B, 001 – Fall 2010
DANIEL SARGENT
The United States and the World Since 1945
History 5, 001 – Fall 2010
THOMAS W. LAQUEUR
European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present

History C132B, 001 – Fall 2010
CANDIDA SMITH
Intellectual History of the United States since 1865
Interdisciplinary Studies Field Maj C101, 001 – Fall 2010
RICHARD A. WALKER
Economic Geography of the Industrial World
Japanese 7A, 001 – Fall 2010
JOHN R. WALLACE
Introduction to Pre-Modern Japanese Literature and Culture
Letters and Science C180V, 001 – Fall 2010
ROBB WILLER
Social Psychology: Self and Society
Letters and Science C70V, 001 – Fall 2010
ROBERT G. JACOBSEN
Descriptive Introduction to Physics

Mathematics 16B, 001 – Fall 2010
THOMAS SCANLON
Analytic Geometry and Calculus – Continuation of 16A. Application of integration of economics and life sciences. Differential equations. Functions of many variables. Partial derivatives, constrained and unconstrained optimization.

Mathematics 1A, 001 – Fall 2010
F. MICHAEL CHRIST
Calculus
Mechanical Engineering C218, 001 – Fall 2010
CLARK TU-CUONG NGUYEN
Introduction to MEMS Design

Molecular and Cell Biology 110, 001 – Fall 2010
QIANG ZHOU, KATHLEEN COLLINS, QING ZHONG
Molecular Biology: Macromolecular Synthesis and Cellular Function
Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology 103 – Fall 2010
SHARON E. FLEMING, DANICA CHEN
Nutrient Function and Metabolism
Philosophy 133, 001 – Fall 2010
JOHN R. SEARLE
Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 138, 001 – Fall 2010
JOHN R. SEARLE
Philosophy of Society
Philosophy 6, 001 – Fall 2010
HUBERT L. DREYFUS
Man, God, and Society in Western Literature
Physics 8A, 002 – Fall 2010
MICHAEL DEWEESE
Introductory Physics
Physics C10, 001 – Fall 2010
ROBERT G. JACOBSEN
Descriptive Introduction to Physics

Political Science 179, 001 – Fall 2010
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science
Psychology 1, 001 – Fall 2010
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
General Psychology
Psychology 107, 001 – Fall 2010
ELEANOR H. ROSCH
Buddhist Psychology
Psychology 130, 001 – Fall 2010
ANN M. KRING
Clinical Psychology
Psychology 131, 001 – Fall 2010
QING ZHOU
Developmental Psychopathology
Public Health 181, 001 – Fall 2010
MALCOLM POTTS
Poverty and Population
Public Health 245, 001 – Fall 2010
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Introduction to Multivariate Statistics
Public Health 250A, 001 – Fall 2010
ARTHUR L. REINGOLD
Epidemiologic Methods I
Public Health 251D, 001 – Fall 2010
TOMAS J ARAGON
Applied Epidemiology using R

Public Health 257B, 001 – Fall 2010
TOMAS J ARAGON
Public Health Preparedness Emergency Response

Sociology C150A, 001 – Fall 2010
ROBB WILLER
Social Psychology: Self and Society
Statistics 131A, 001 – Fall 2010
FLETCHER H IBSER
Statistical Inferences for Social and Life Scientists
Statistics 20, 003 – Fall 2010
DEBORAH NOLAN
Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Statistics 21, 001 – Fall 2010
FLETCHER H IBSER
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business
Spring 2010
Anthropology 112 – Spring 2010
TERRENCE W. DEACON
Special Topics in Biological Anthropology
Anthropology 114 – Spring 2010
ROSEMARY JOYCE
History of Anthropological Thought
Astronomy 7B – Spring 2010
JOSHUA SIMON BLOOM
Introduction to Astrophysics
Biology 1A, 001 – Spring 2010
GARY L. FIRESTONE, JASPER D. RINE, JENNIFER A DOUDNA
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function. Intended for biological sciences majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1AL, 001 – Spring 2010
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.

Biology 1B, 001 – Spring 2010
LEWIS J FELDMAN, CRAIG MORITZ, VINCENT H. RESH
General Biology

Chemistry 1A, 002 – Spring 2010
HEINO NITSCHE
General Chemistry

Computer Science 162 – Spring 2010
ION STOICA
Operating Systems and System Programming
Computer Science 61A, 001 – Spring 2010
SATISH B RAO, BRIAN HARVEY
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

Computer Science 61C – Spring 2010
DANIEL GARCIA
Machine Structures
Demography 145AC – Spring 2010
CARL MASON
The American Immigrant Experience
Economics 100A – Spring 2010
GLENN A WOROCH
Economic Analysis – Micro
Economics 100B – Spring 2010
STEVEN A. WOOD
Economic Analysis–Macro – A study of the factors which determine national income, employment, and price levels, with attention to the effects of monetary and fiscal policy.
Economics C3 – Spring 2010
GORDON RAUSSER
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy
Electrical Engineering 119 – Spring 2010
JEFFREY BOKOR
Introduction to Optical Engineering
Electrical Engineering 141, 001 – Spring 2010
JAN M. RABAEY
Introduction to Digital Integrated Circuits

Electrical Engineering 240, 001 – Spring 2010
ELAD ALON
Advanced Analog Integrated Circuits

Electrical Engineering 40 – Spring 2010
BERNHARD E. BOSER
Introduction to Microelectronic Circuits
Environ Sci, Policy, and Management 114 – Spring 2010
JUSTIN S. BRASHARES
Wildlife Ecology
Environmental Economics and Policy C1 – Spring 2010
GORDON RAUSSER
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy
Geography 10 – Spring 2010
NATHAN F. SAYRE
World Regions, Peoples, and States
Geography 130 – Spring 2010
NATHAN F. SAYRE
Natural Resources and Population
History 151C – Spring 2010
JAMES VERNON
The Peculiar Modernity of Britain, 1848-2000
History C139B – Spring 2010
CARL MASON
The American Immigrant Experience
Japanese 159 – Spring 2010
JOHN R. WALLACE
Contemporary Japanese Literature
Japanese 7B – Spring 2010
JOHN R. WALLACE
Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture
Legal Studies 160 – Spring 2010
JONATHAN S. SIMON
Punishment, Culture, and Society
Letters and Science 140D – Spring 2010
THOMAS W. LAQUEUR
Historical Studies
Letters and Science C70V, 001 – Spring 2010
ROBERT G. JACOBSEN
Descriptive Introduction to Physics

Mathematics 1B, 002 – Spring 2010
PER-OLOF PERSSON
Calculus
Molecular and Cell Biology 31 – Spring 2010
FRED H. WILT
Genes, Cells, and Creatures
Philosophy 132 – Spring 2010
JOHN R. SEARLE
Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy 3 – Spring 2010
JOHN JOSEPH CAMPBELL
The Nature of Mind
Physics 8A – Spring 2010
JOEL FAJANS
Introductory Physics
Physics 8A – Spring 2010
JOEL FAJANS
Introductory Physics
Physics 8B – Spring 2010
MICHAEL DEWEESE
Introductory Physics
Physics C10, 001 – Spring 2010
ROBERT G. JACOBSEN
Descriptive Introduction to Physics

Plant and Microbial Biology 160 – Spring 2010
ROBERT L. FISCHER, JENNIFER C. FLETCHER
Plant Molecular Genetics
Political Science 179 – Spring 2010
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science
Practice Of Art 8 – Spring 2010
JOHN S. MCNAMARA
Introduction to Visual Thinking
Psychology 101 – Spring 2010
FREDERIC THEUNISSEN
Research and Data Analysis in Psychology
Psychology 140 – Spring 2010
ALISON GOPNIK
Developmental Psychology
Psychology 164 – Spring 2010
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
Social Cognition
Public Health 112 – Spring 2010
SUNEETA KRISHNAN, ARTHUR L. REINGOLD
Global Health: A Multidisciplinary Examination
Public Health 145 – Spring 2010
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Statistical Analysis of Continuous Outcome Data
Public Health 241 – Spring 2010
NICHOLAS P. JEWELL
Statistical Analysis of Categorical Data
Public Health 253E, 001 – Spring 2010
HARVEY KAYMAN
Ethical Challenges in Public Health Interventions: Catastrophic and Routine

Public Health C155 – Spring 2010
LAURA NATHAN
Sociology of Health and Medicine
Public Health C242C – Spring 2010
P. JEWELL, ALAN HUBBARD
Longitudinal Data Analysis
Sociology 150A – Spring 2010
ROBB WILLER
Social Psychology: Self and Society
Sociology C115 – Spring 2010
LAURA NATHAN
Sociology of Health and Medicine
Statistics 134, 002 – Spring 2010
FLETCHER H IBSER
Concepts of Probability
Statistics 21, 001 – Spring 2010
FLETCHER H IBSER
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business

Statistics C247C – Spring 2010
P. JEWELL, ALAN HUBBARD
Longitudinal Data Analysis
Fall 2009
Biology 1A – Fall 2009
RICHARD MALKIN, ROBERT L. FISCHER, JOHN G. FORTE
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function. Intended for biological sciences majors, but open to all qualified students.
Biology 1AL – Fall 2009
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.
Biology 1B – Fall 2009
MARY E. POWER, THOMAS J CARLSON, JOHN P. HUELSENBECK
General Biology
Chemistry 1A – Fall 2009
MICHELLE CHRISTINE DOUSKEY, ANGELICA STACY
General Chemistry
Chemistry 3B – Fall 2009
PETER VOLLHARDT
Chemical Structure and Reactivity
Cognitive Science C127 – Fall 2009
RICHARD IVRY
Cognitive Neuroscience
Computer Science 162 – Fall 2009
JOHN KUBIATOWICZ
Operating Systems and System Programming
Computer Science 61A – Fall 2009
BRIAN HARVEY
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
Computer Science 61B – Fall 2009
PAUL HILFINGER
Data Structures
Computer Science 61CL – Fall 2009
DAVID CULLER
Machine Structures
East Asian Languages and Cultures 105 – Fall 2009
JOHN R. WALLACE
Dynamics of Romantic Core Values in East Asian Premodern Literatu
Economics C110 – Fall 2009
YVES ZENOU
Game Theory in the Social Sciences
Economics C181 – Fall 2009
STEVEN A. WOOD
International Trade
Economics C3 – Fall 2009
PETER BERCK
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy
Electrical Engineering 105 – Fall 2009
SAYEEF SALAHUDDIN
Microelectronic Devices and Circuits
Electrical Engineering 141 – Fall 2009
ELAD ALON
Introduction to Digital Integrated Circuits
Engineering 7 – Fall 2009
ROBERTO HOROWITZ
Introduction to Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers
English 45B – Fall 2009
CHARLES F. ALTIERI
Literature in English
Environmental Economics and Policy C1 – Fall 2009
PETER BERCK
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy
Environmental Economics and Policy C181 – Fall 2009
STEVEN A. WOOD
International Trade
Geography C110 – Fall 2009
RICHARD A. WALKER
Economic Geography of the Industrial World
History 162A – Fall 2009
DAVID WETZEL
Europe and the World: Wars, Empires, Nations 1648-1914
Interdisciplinary Studies Field Maj C101 – Fall 2009
RICHARD A. WALKER
Economic Geography of the Industrial World
Legal Studies 109 – Fall 2009
TAMARA R. LAVE
Aims and Limits of the Criminal Law
Legal Studies 163 – Fall 2009
FRANKLIN E. ZIMRING
Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Justice
Letters and Science C70V – Fall 2009
RICHARD MULLER
Descriptive Introduction to Physics
Mathematics 1A – Fall 2009
F. MICHAEL CHRIST
Calculus
Mathematics 53, 001 – Fall 2009
EDWARD FRENKEL
Mathematics

Molecular and Cell Biology 110 – Fall 2009
QIANG ZHOU, GING ZHONG, THOMAS C. ALBER
Molecular and Cell Biology
Nuclear Engineering 101 – Fall 2009
ERIC B. NORMAN
Nuclear Reactions and Radiation
Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology 103 – Fall 2009
SHARON E. FLEMING
Nutrient Function and Metabolism
Philosophy 135 – Fall 2009
JOHN JOSEPH CAMPBELL
Theory of Meaning
Philosophy 138 – Fall 2009
JOHN R. SEARLE
Philosophy of Society
Philosophy 7 – Fall 2009
HUBERT L. DREYFUS
Existentialism in Literature and Film
Physics 7A – Fall 2009
STEVEN EDWARD BOGGS
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
Physics 8A, 002 – Fall 2009
MICHAEL DEWEESE
Introductory Physics
Physics C10 – Fall 2009
RICHARD MULLER
Descriptive Introduction to Physics
Physics H7A – Fall 2009
DMITRY BUDKER
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
Political Science 179 – Fall 2009
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science
Political Science C135 – Fall 2009
YVES ZENOU
Game Theory in the Social Sciences
Practice Of Art 23AC, 001 – Fall 2009
OZGE SAMANCI, GREG NIEMEYER
Foundations of American Cyber-Culture

Psychology 1 – Fall 2009
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
General Psychology
Psychology 106 – Fall 2009
ELEANOR H. ROSCH
Psychology of Dreams
Psychology 130 – Fall 2009
ANN M. KRING
Clinical Psychology
Psychology C127 – Fall 2009
RICHARD IVRY
Cognitive Neuroscience
Public Health 245 – Fall 2009
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Introduction to Multivariate Statistics
Public Health 250A – Fall 2009
ARTHUR L. REINGOLD
Epidemiologic Methods I
Public Policy 190 – Fall 2009
STEPHEN MAURER
Special Topics in Public Policy
Public Policy 290 – Fall 2009
STEPHEN MAURER
Special Topics in Public Policy
Religious Studies 90A – Fall 2009
NIKLAUS LARGIER
Introductory Topics in Religious Studies
Statistics 2 – Fall 2009
FLETCHER H IBSER
Introduction to Statistics
Statistics 21 – Fall 2009
PHILIP B. STARK
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business

Spring 2009
Anthropology 1 – Spring 2009
TERRENCE W. DEACON
Introduction to Biological Anthropology – An introduction to human evolution. Physical and behavioral adaptations of humans and their prehistoric and living relatives. Issues in evolutionary theory, molecular evolution, primate behavior, interpretation of fossils. Prehistoric activities, racial differences, genetic components of behavior are defined and evaluated.
Biology 1A – Spring 2009
GARY FIRESTONE, FRED WILT, JASPER RINE
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function. Intended for biological sciences majors, but open to all qualified students.
Biology 1AL – Spring 2009
MICHAEL MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function. Intended for biological sciences majors, but open to all qualified students.
Biology 1B – Spring 2009
JOHN P. HUELSENBECK, LEWIS J FELDMAN, VINCENT H. RESH
General Biology
Chemistry 1A, 002 – Spring 2009
HEINO NITSCHE
General Chemistry
Cognitive Science C102 – Spring 2009
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
Scientific Approaches to Consciousness
Demography C175 – Spring 2009
RONALD D. LEE
Economic Demography
Economics 100B – Spring 2009
ARNAV SHETH
Economic Analysis–Macro – A study of the factors which determine national income, employment, and price levels, with attention to the effects of monetary and fiscal policy.
Economics C175 – Spring 2009
RONALD D. LEE
Economic Demography
Economics C181 – Spring 2009
STEVEN A. WOOD
International Trade
Education 274B – Spring 2009
MARK WILSON
Measurement in Education and the Social Sciences II
Electrical Engineering 141 – Spring 2009
JAN M. RABAEY
Introduction to Digital Integrated Circuits
Electrical Engineering 240 – Spring 2009
ELAD ALON
Advanced Analog Integrated Circuits
Electrical Engineering 241 – Spring 2009
BORIVOJE NIKOLIC
Advanced Digital Integrated Circuits
Energy and Resources Group 102 – Spring 2009
JOHN HARTE
Quantitative Aspects of Global Environmental Problems
Engineering 45 – Spring 2009
R. REMESH
Properties of Materials
Engineering 7 – Spring 2009
JAMES W. RECTOR
Introduction to Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Environ Sci, Policy, and Management 114 – Spring 2009
JUSTIN S. BRASHARES
Wildlife Ecology
Environmental Economics and Policy C181 – Spring 2009
STEVEN A. WOOD
International Trade
Geography 20 – Spring 2009
ROBERT LAWRENCE ACKER
Globalization
Industrial Engin and Oper Research 131 – Spring 2009
LEE W. SCHRUBEN
Event Simulation
Law 271.71 – Spring 2009
CYMIE PAYNE
International Environmental Law

Letters and Science C70V – Spring 2009
RICHARD MULLER
Descriptive Introduction to Physics
Molecular and Cell Biology 130 – Spring 2009
RANDY W SCHEKMAN, KUNXIN LUO, DAVID G. DRUBIN
Cell Biology
Physics 8A, 002 – Spring 2009
JOEL FAJANS
Introductory Physics
Physics 8B, 002 – Spring 2009
ROBERT G. JACOBSEN
Introductory Physics
Physics C10 – Spring 2009
RICHARD MULLER
Descriptive Introduction to Physics
Political Science 179 – Spring 2009
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science
Psychology C129 – Spring 2009
JOHN F. KIHLSTROM
Scientific Approaches to Consciousness
Public Health 241 – Spring 2009
NICHOLAS P. JEWELL
Statistical Analysis of Categorical Data
Sociology 150A – Spring 2009
ROBB WILLER
Social Psychology: Self and Society

Statistics 21 – Spring 2009
FLETCHER H IBSER
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business
Fall 2008
Biology 1A – Fall 2008
RICHARD MALKIN, ROBERT L. FISCHER, GARY L. FIRESTONE
General Biology Lecture – General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function. Intended for biological sciences majors, but open to all qualified students.
Biology 1AL – Fall 2008
MIKE MEIGHAN
General Biology Laboratory – Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.
Biology 1B – Fall 2008
MARY E. POWER, THOMAS J CARLSON, BRENT D MISHLER
General Biology
Chemistry 1A – Fall 2008
KRISTIE A BOERING, MARCIN M. MAJDA, ANGELICA STACY
General Chemistry
Chemistry 3B – Fall 2008
PETER VOLLHARDT
Chemical Structure and Reactivity
Cognitive Science C127 – Fall 2008
RICHARD IVRY
Cognitive Neuroscience
Computer Science 162 – Fall 2008
JOHN KUBIATOWICZ
Operating Systems and System Programming
Computer Science 61A – Fall 2008
BRIAN HARVEY
The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
Computer Science 61B – Fall 2008
PAUL HILFINGER
Data Structures
Computer Science 61CL – Fall 2008
DAVID CULLER, MICHAEL J. CLANCY
Machine Structures
Economics 100B – Fall 2008
STEVEN A. WOOD
Economic Analysis–Macro – A study of the factors which determine national income, employment, and price levels, with attention to the effects of monetary and fiscal policy.
Economics 113 – Fall 2008
J. BRADFORD DELONG
American Economic History
Education 274A – Fall 2008
MARK WILSON
Measurement in Education and the Social Sciences I
Electrical Engineering 141 – Fall 2008
ELAD ALON
Introduction to Digital Integrated Circuits
Electrical Engineering 20N – Fall 2008
BABAK AYAZIFAR
Structure and Interpretation of Systems and Signals
Electrical Engineering 247 – Fall 2008
HAIDEH KHORRAMABADI
Analysis and Design of VLSI Analog-Digital Interface Integrated C
Electrical Engineering 40 – Fall 2008
CONSTANCE J. CHANG-HASNAIN
Introduction to Microelectronic Circuits
English 45B – Fall 2008
CHARLES F. ALTIERI
Literature in English
English 45C – Fall 2008
CHARLES F. ALTIERI
Literature in English
Geography C110 – Fall 2008
RICHARD A. WALKER
Economic Geography of the Industrial World
History 5 – Fall 2008
CARLA HESSE
European Civilization from the Renaissance to the Present
Integrative Biology 131 – Fall 2008
MARIAN C. DIAMOND
General Human Anatomy
International and Area Studies 106 – Fall 2008
MAXIMILIAN AUFFHAMMER
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
International and Area Studies 180 – Fall 2008
PAULA GOLDMAN
Current Issues in International and Area Studies
Law 272.3 – Fall 2008
CYMIE PAYNE, DANIEL FARBER
Climate Change: Law and Policy

Letters and Science C70V – Fall 2008
RICHARD MULLER
Descriptive Introduction to Physics
Mathematics 53 – Fall 2008
MICHAEL HUTCHINGS
Multivariable Calculus
Mechanical Engineering 119 – Fall 2008
LIWEI LIN
Introduction to MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems)
Molecular and Cell Biology 110 – Fall 2008
QIANG ZHOU, RANDY W SCHEKMAN, THOMAS C. ALBER
Molecular Biology: Macromolecular Synthesis and Cellular Function
Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology 103 – Fall 2008
SHARON E. FLEMING
Nutrient Function and Metabolism
Philosophy 25A – Fall 2008
DAVID B. EBREY
Ancient Philosophy
Philosophy 6 – Fall 2008
HUBERT L. DREYFUS
Man, God, and Society in Western Literature
Physics 8A – Fall 2008
ROBERT G. JACOBSEN
Introductory Physics
Physics 8B – Fall 2008
MICHAEL DEWEESE
Introductory Physics
Political Science 179 – Fall 2008
ALAN DAVID ROSS
Undergraduate Colloquium on Political Science
Practice Of Art 23AC – Fall 2008
JOSEPH DONALD MCKAY
Foundations of American Cyber-Culture
Psychology 101 – Fall 2008
FREDERIC THEUNISSEN
Research and Data Analysis in Psychology
Psychology 107 – Fall 2008
ELEANOR H. ROSCH
Buddhist Psychology
Psychology 140 – Fall 2008
ALISON GOPNIK
Developmental Psychology
Psychology 156 – Fall 2008
DACHER KELTNER
Human Emotion
iTunes U
AUDIO
Public Health 245 – Fall 2008
MAUREEN LAHIFF
Introduction to Multivariate Statistics
Public Health 250A – Fall 2008
ARTHUR L. REINGOLD
Epidemiologic Methods I
Statistics 131A – Fall 2008
FLETCHER H IBSER
Statistical Inferences for Social and Life Scientists
Statistics 2 – Fall 2008
FLETCHER H IBSER
Introduction to Statistics
Popular Courses
Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 01: Organization of Body
Professor Marian Diamond
Physics 10 – Lecture 01: Atoms and Heat
Professor Richard A. Muller
SIMS 141 – Search, Google, and Life
Sergey Brin – Google
Psychology 1 – General Psychology – Lecture 1
Professor John F. Kihlstrom
PACS 164A: Introduction to Nonviolence
Professor Michael Nagler
Photo of Sather gate
Keep Webcast Alive and Strong
Contributions from alumni and community members help us keep this website alive.
Donate today.
copyright & fair use | help & more info | news archive | UC Berkeley